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Predicted Percentage Dissatisfied with Ankle Draft
Center for the Built Environment, University of California, Berkeley, CA, USA.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-0642-9700
Center for the Built Environment, University of California, Berkeley, CA, USA.ORCID iD: 0000-0003-1285-5682
University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Building, Energy and Environmental Engineering, Energy system.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-2171-3013
Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of California, Berkeley, CA, USA.ORCID iD: 0000-0001-5645-3357
2017 (English)In: Indoor Air, ISSN 0905-6947, E-ISSN 1600-0668, Vol. 27, no 4, 852-862 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Draft is unwanted local convective cooling. The draft risk model of Fanger et al. (Energy and Buildings 12, 21-39, 1988) estimates the percentage of people dissatisfied with air movement due to overcooling at the neck. There is no model for predicting draft at ankles, which is more relevant to stratified air distribution systems such as underfloor air distribution (UFAD) and displacement ventilation (DV). We developed a model for predicted percentage dissatisfied with ankle draft (PPDAD ) based on laboratory experiments with 110 college students. We assessed the effect on ankle draft of various combinations of air speed (nominal range: 0.1-0.6 m/s), temperature (nominal range: 16.5-22.5 °C), turbulence intensity (at ankles), sex, and clothing insulation (< 0.7 clo; lower legs uncovered and covered). The results show that whole body thermal sensation and air speed at ankles are the dominant parameters affecting draft. The seated subjects accepted a vertical temperature difference of up to 8 °C between ankles (0.1 m) and head (1.1 m) at neutral whole body thermal sensation, 5 °C more than the maximum difference recommended in existing standards. The developed ankle draft model can be implemented in thermal comfort and air diffuser testing standards.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2017. Vol. 27, no 4, 852-862 p.
Keyword [en]
displacement ventilation; draft risk model; local thermal discomfort; thermal comfort; thermal stratification; underfloor air distribution
National Category
Fluid Mechanics and Acoustics Building Technologies
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-23266DOI: 10.1111/ina.12364PubMedID: 28005297Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-85010781747OAI: oai:DiVA.org:hig-23266DiVA: diva2:1063601
Available from: 2017-01-10 Created: 2017-01-10 Last updated: 2017-07-03Bibliographically approved

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Liu, ShichaoSchiavon, StefanoKabanshi, AlanNazaroff, William W
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