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Gaming and School Langauge: A study of gamers’ use of a second language and attitudes towards English during online gaming and in the classroom
University of Gävle, Faculty of Education and Business Studies, Department of Humanities.
2017 (English)Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
Sustainable development
Sustainable development according to the University's criteria is not relevant for the essay/thesis
Abstract [en]

This research paper investigates the language that is used by upper secondary students both in gaming and in school related situations. The overarching aim is to compare the language that students in upper secondary school use during online gaming and in classroom situations and how one influences the other and what attitudes students have regarding spoken English during online gaming and in the classroom. A questionnaire was used to gather information about the students’ gamer habits and how they perceive the connection between online games and second language learning. The results provided by the questionnaire showed that there is a positive attitude among the students regarding how online games can provide opportunities for expansion of a second language vocabulary. Many of the students felt that the online sphere provided a more secure and more accessible setting for learning than what their school could give them. It also showed that second language learning through online gaming is possible, but at the same that the language provided through online games has limited use in for example a school environment. Words and phrases that the students have picked up from online gaming are in many cases not useful outside of the speech community of gamers. Therefore, the conclusion that was made was that online gaming is a large part of many students’ second language learning and that many students feel that is a more accessible way to learn a second language. Therefore, a didactic implication is that it is important that teachers start to include online gaming language in their education.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2017. , 21 p.
Keyword [en]
Gaming, Language, School, attitudes towards English, Classroom language
National Category
Specific Languages Human Aspects of ICT
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-23592OAI: oai:DiVA.org:hig-23592DiVA: diva2:1073224
Subject / course
English language education
Educational program
Upper Secondary Teacher Education Programme
Supervisors
Examiners
Available from: 2017-02-13 Created: 2017-02-09 Last updated: 2017-02-13Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

fulltext(760 kB)313 downloads
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File name FULLTEXT01.pdfFile size 760 kBChecksum SHA-512
d69e14ccbcbd005d848a43203fbc217186e43ab4b9a517ed20ca9aeeb670ccdb41fe7a80f3cc6468ac0a9534d61bd525cb14718e82b72182af991d2ac432a96a
Type fulltextMimetype application/pdf

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Department of Humanities
Specific LanguagesHuman Aspects of ICT

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CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard-cite-them-right
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • sv-SE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • de-DE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf