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Sex-Specific Links in Motor and Sensory Adaptations to Repetitive Motion-Induced Fatigue
Department of Kinesiology and Physical Education, McGill University, Montreal, Canada; Occupational Biomechanics and Ergonomics Laboratory, Michael Feil and Ted Oberfeld/CRIR Research Center, Jewish Rehabilitation Hospital, Laval, Quebec, Canada .
University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, Occupational health science. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research. Department of Industrial and Systems Engineering, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Blacksburg, Virginia.ORCID iD: 0000-0001-9327-6177
Department of Kinesiology and Physical Education, McGill University, Montreal; Occupational Biomechanics and Ergonomics Laboratory, Michael Feil and Ted Oberfeld/CRIR Research Center, Jewish Rehabilitation Hospital, Laval, Quebec, Canada.
2017 (English)In: Motor Control, ISSN 1087-1640, E-ISSN 1543-2696Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

The objectives of this study were to assess the sex-specific relationships between motor and sensory adaptations to repetitive arm motion-induced neck/shoulder fatigue, and measure how additional sensory stimulation affected these adaptations. Twenty-three participants performed two sessions of a repetitive pointing task until scoring 8 on the Borg CR10 scale for neck/shoulder exertion or for a maximum of 45min, with and without sensory stimulation (i.e. light touch) applied on the fatiguing shoulder. Just before reaching the task termination criteria, all participants showed changes in mean and variability of arm joint angles and experienced a five-fold increase in anterior deltoid (AD) sensory threshold in the stimulus-present condition. Women with the greatest increases in AD sensory thresholds demonstrated the greatest increases in shoulder variability (r= .66) whereas men with the greatest increases in upper trapezius sensory thresholds demonstrated greatest changes in shoulder angle (r= -.60) and coordination (r= .65) variability. Thus, sensory stimulation had no influence on time-to-termination but affected how men and women differently adapted, suggesting sex differences in the sensorimotor fatigue response mechanisms.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2017.
National Category
Environmental Health and Occupational Health
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URN: urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-24200DOI: 10.1123/mc.2017-0004PubMedID: 28530500OAI: oai:DiVA.org:hig-24200DiVA: diva2:1109302
Available from: 2017-06-13 Created: 2017-06-13 Last updated: 2017-07-04Bibliographically approved

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