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Evaluation of natural sounds in urban greenery: potential impact for urban nature preservation
Department of Forest Resource Management, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Umeå, Sweden; Department of Ecology, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala, Sweden.ORCID iD: 0000-0003-1594-8665
University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Social Work and Psychology, Psychology.
Department of Landscape Architecture, Planning and Management, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Alnarp, Sweden.
Department of Biological and Environmental Sciences, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
2017 (English)In: Royal Society Open Science, E-ISSN 2054-5703, Vol. 4, no 2, 170037Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Most humans now live in cities and their main experience of nature is through urban greenery. An increasing number of studies show the importance of urban green spaces for wellbeing, although most of them are based on visual perception. A questionnaire examining people’s evaluations of natural sounds was answered by 1326 individuals living near one of six urban green areas of varying naturalness in the city of Gothenburg, Sweden. Women and the elderly reported greater calmness when hearing bird song and rustling leaves (and placed a higher importance on the richness of bird species) than did men, younger and middle-aged individuals. Independent of age and gender, urban woodlands (high naturalness) had higher evaluations than parks (low naturalness). Our results suggest that to increase positive experiences of urban green areas, demographic variables of gender and age should be taken into account, and settings that mimic nature should be prioritized in planning.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2017. Vol. 4, no 2, 170037
Keyword [en]
urban greenery; soundscape; bird song; urban woodlands; urban planning; biodiversity
National Category
Psychology Forest Science
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-24318DOI: 10.1098/rsos.170037ISI: 000394469300048PubMedID: 28386456ScopusID: 2-s2.0-85012950261OAI: oai:DiVA.org:hig-24318DiVA: diva2:1110906
Funder
Swedish Research Council FormasMistra Urban FuturesSwedish Transport Administration, 2012-3411-22602-60
Available from: 2017-06-16 Created: 2017-06-16 Last updated: 2017-06-16Bibliographically approved

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CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

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Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
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  • asciidoc
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