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Bird diversity improves the well-being of city residents
Department of Forest Resource Management, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Umeå, Sweden; Department of Ecology, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala, Sweden.
University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Social Work and Psychology, Psychology.
Department of Biological and Environmental Sciences, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
2017 (English)In: Ecology and Conservation of Birds in Urban Environments / [ed] Enrique Murgui, Marcus Hedblom, Springer, 2017, 287-306 p.Chapter in book (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Humans are increasingly becoming urbanized. Because a number of bird species readily live in urban areas and birds are relatively easily observed, birds are becoming the largest everyday encounter with wild fauna people will have, globally. Despite, few studies have been made on how visual (or acoustic) bird encounter affects humans. The few existing studies show that birds provide humans with increased self-evaluated well-being when seeing and hearing them. These values provided by birds can be recognized as a cultural ecosystems service. Here we review extant literature to consider why certain species fascinate humans more than others, and some can increase well-being and provide ecosystem services, while others offer disservices through unappealing characteristics. We particularly highlight indications of links between species diversity and well-being. Finally, we discuss possible reasons for variations in our responses to birds and birdsong associated with age, gender, childhood, contact with nature, and the biophilia theory. If interaction with birds truly increases quality of life, then this value should be considered in the planning of sustainable cities. Both conservation and proper management of existing urban green areas are needed to increase possibilities to encounter many bird species. © Springer International Publishing AG 2017.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2017. 287-306 p.
Keyword [en]
Biodiversity, Green space, Passerines, Songbirds, Urban soundscape, Urban woodland
National Category
Other Agricultural Sciences Psychology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-24631DOI: 10.1007/978-3-319-43314-1_15Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-85019931651ISBN: 9783319433141 (electronic)ISBN: 9783319433127 (print)OAI: oai:DiVA.org:hig-24631DiVA: diva2:1118524
Available from: 2017-06-30 Created: 2017-06-30 Last updated: 2017-07-04Bibliographically approved

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CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf