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Rewiring food systems to enhance human health and biosphere stewardship.
Stockholm Resilience Centre, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-3520-4340
Stockholm Resilience Centre, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden; Global Economic Dynamics and the Biosphere Program, Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences, Stockholm, Sweden.
Stockholm Resilience Centre, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden; WorldFish, Jalan Batu Maung, Bayan Lepas, Penang, Malaysia.
Stockholm Resilience Centre, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden; Global Economic Dynamics and the Biosphere Program, Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences, Stockholm, Sweden; Leonard N Stern School of Business, Center for Sustainable Business, New York, NY, United States.
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2017 (English)In: Environmental Research Letters, ISSN 1748-9326, E-ISSN 1748-9326, Vol. 12, no 10, 100201Article in journal, Editorial material (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Food lies at the heart of both health and sustainability challenges. We use a social-ecological framework to illustrate how major changes to the volume, nutrition and safety of food systems between 1961 and today impact health and sustainability. These changes have almost halved undernutrition while doubling the proportion who are overweight. They have also resulted in reduced resilience of the biosphere, pushing four out of six analysed planetary boundaries across the safe operating space of the biosphere. Our analysis further illustrates that consumers and producers have become more distant from one another, with substantial power consolidated within a small group of key actors. Solutions include a shift from a volume-focused production system to focus on quality, nutrition, resource use efficiency, and reduced antimicrobial use. To achieve this, we need to rewire food systems in ways that enhance transparency between producers and consumers, mobilize key actors to become biosphere stewards, and re-connect people to the biosphere

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2017. Vol. 12, no 10, 100201
Keyword [en]
social-ecological, great acceleration, Anthropocene, food environment, nutrition, sustainability
National Category
Environmental Sciences Other Social Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-25556DOI: 10.1088/1748-9326/aa81dcISI: 000412928700001Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-85033700541OAI: oai:DiVA.org:hig-25556DiVA: diva2:1159096
Funder
Mistra - The Swedish Foundation for Strategic Environmental ResearchMarianne and Marcus Wallenberg FoundationSida - Swedish International Development Cooperation Agency
Note

Funding: Mistra, Beijer Foundation, Erling-Persson Family Foundation, Marianne and Marcus Wallenberg Foundation, Ebba & Sven Schwartz Foundation, Sida 

Available from: 2017-11-21 Created: 2017-11-21 Last updated: 2017-12-06Bibliographically approved

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  • apa
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