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Reduced muscular oxygenation during computer mouse use with time pressure and precision demands
University of Gävle, Belastningsskadecentrum.
University of Gävle, Belastningsskadecentrum.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-5055-0698
University of Gävle, Belastningsskadecentrum.
University of Gävle, Belastningsskadecentrum.
2004 (English)In: Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise, ISSN 0195-9131, E-ISSN 1530-0315, Vol. 35, no 5, S221-S222 p.Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.)) Published
Abstract [en]

Monitoring oxidative metabolic states may provide information on the mechanism behind computer use related musculoskeletal disorders. PURPOSE: To compare tissue oxygen saturation (Sat-O2) profiles in the forearm extensor carpi radialis (ECR) during computer mouse use with and without time pressure and precision demands. METHODS: Twenty-four healthy, right-handed subjects (12 females, 12 males; age 19-28 years) participated in the study. Subjects performed a 45-min mouse operated computer task on two occasions, separated by 3-5 days. The task consisted of painting squares that were presented on the screen. On one occasion, time pressure and precision demands were imposed by limiting the time available for painting a square and introducing a scoring system based on precision of painting (STRESS). On the other occasion, no such restraints were added (NON-STRESS). The order of the two task versions was randomized. During the task, Sat-O2 in the right ECR muscle was measured by near-infrared spectroscopy – NIRS (Inspectra, Hutchinson Technology). In addition, subjective ratings of tenseness and strain, and painting performance measures were recorded. RESULTS: A repeated measures ANOVA revealed a significant decline in Sat-O2 during the STRESS condition (p < 0.05), but no change for the NON-STRESS condition. A gender difference was apparent as females exhibited an overall lower Sat-O2 than males (p < 0.05); however, no interaction was found. Subjectsメ ratings of tenseness and strain were significantly higher during the STRESS as compared to the NON-STRESS condition (p < 0.001). These data were paralleled by work pace (i.e. squares painted during STRESS = 119; NON-STRESS = 84, p < 0.001). Furthermore, accuracy of painting was greater for the STRESS as compared to the NON-STRESS condition (p < 0.01), i.e., number of times outside the square, STRESS = 2, NON-STRESS = 4. No gender differences in subjective ratings or performance variables were detected. CONCLUSIONS: Our finding of a change in local metabolic states under stressful conditions may shed light on the mechanism behind computer mouse related forearm muscular disorders. Furthermore, that females demonstrate a lower ECR Sat-O2 could give precedence to their higher incidence of disorders than males

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2004. Vol. 35, no 5, S221-S222 p.
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-951OAI: oai:DiVA.org:hig-951DiVA: diva2:117613
Available from: 2007-12-04 Created: 2007-12-04 Last updated: 2014-12-12Bibliographically approved

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