hig.sePublications
Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard-cite-them-right
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • sv-SE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • de-DE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Innovation and employee injury risk in automotive disassembly operations
Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering, Ryerson University, Toronto, Canada.
Department of Sociology and Work Science, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden; Department of Management Engineering, Technical University of Denmark, Kongens Lyngby, Denmark.
Occupational and Environmental Medicine, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, Occupational health science. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research. Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.ORCID iD: 0000-0001-5777-4232
2018 (English)In: International Journal of Production Research, ISSN 0020-7543, E-ISSN 1366-588X, Vol. 56, no 9, p. 3188-3203Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Engineering innovations in car disassembly systems are studied for affects on system operators’ risk of repetitive strain injury (RSI). Objective instrumented measures of injury risk factors with synchronized video-based task analyses were used to examine changes in operators’ RSI risk during two cases of engineering innovation: 1) a shift in industrial model from traditional extracting saleable parts to line-based full material recovery, and 2) the prospective effects of a simulated “Lean” inspired process improvement in the line system.

Both cases of innovation showed significantly increased movement speeds and reduced muscular recovery opportunities, implying increased RSI risk. This case study reveals a mechanism by which innovation may increase RSI risks for operators. Managers responsible for engineering innovation should ensure their teams have the tools and mandate necessary to control injury hazards as part of the development and design process. These cases suggest how failure to manage RSI hazards in the innovation process may allow increases of injury risks that can compromise operational performance. This “innovation pitfall” has implications for operator health and organizational sustainability. Alternative pathways are discussed.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis, 2018. Vol. 56, no 9, p. 3188-3203
Keywords [en]
Human Factors, Corporate Social Responsibility, Ergonomics, Disassembly, Design af Production Systems, Workload Control, Closed-loop Supply Chain
National Category
Occupational Health and Environmental Health
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-26137DOI: 10.1080/00207543.2018.1432910ISI: 000434401700010Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-85042937746OAI: oai:DiVA.org:hig-26137DiVA, id: diva2:1182210
Available from: 2018-02-12 Created: 2018-02-12 Last updated: 2018-06-25Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

No full text in DiVA

Other links

Publisher's full textScopus

Authority records BETA

Forsman, Mikael

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Forsman, Mikael
By organisation
Occupational health scienceCentre for Musculoskeletal Research
In the same journal
International Journal of Production Research
Occupational Health and Environmental Health

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

doi
urn-nbn

Altmetric score

doi
urn-nbn
Total: 68 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard-cite-them-right
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • sv-SE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • de-DE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf