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Instructional Strategies and Student Learning Outcomes
University of Gävle, Department of Technology and Built Environment, Ämnesavdelningen för byggnadskvalitet.
University of Gävle, Department of Education and Psychology, Ämnesavdelningen för didaktik.
2006 (English)In: Higher Education Close Up III Conference at the University of Lancaster, 2006, p. 1-18Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

When planning a new educational program concern has been given to the fact that a new coming student at the University does not know anything about scientific reading and writing. Also a new student does not have an academic study technique. Students have a wage idea of what to do during their studies at the University. Therefore the two first courses in the educational program came to be focusing perspectives on knowledge and learning and an introduction to their studies to come. The article reflects on instructional strategies and learning outcomes in academic studies, using a narrative research approach. Narratives are used in four ways. Student narratives are used for data collection. Teachers use narratives as instructional strategy. Narratives are in this research used as an analytical tool and in this article as a research presentation model. Qualitative narrative statements from students have been taken at four occasions, direct after the courses, three months after, one, two and three years after the courses. Interpretations of the narratives have shown that students forget the course content rather soon after a course where mainly surface instructional strategies are used. They express though, that the surface learning have eased their learning capability when studying subjects later in their study program. This generative effect should be regarded we think when planning academic course programs. Another reflection is that students are better able to fulfil the academic deep learning studies when they get an early introduction of academic studies concerning critical scientific reading and writing. Also instructional strategies that early introduce concepts and views in generative topics make learning more efficient. When teachers and students communicate and are able to create a positive and for the students developing study climate, learning is promoted.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2006. p. 1-18
Keywords [en]
Generative, Techer Instructions, Student learning
National Category
Business Administration
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-2026OAI: oai:DiVA.org:hig-2026DiVA, id: diva2:118688
Conference
Higher Education Close Up III, Lancaster, UK, 24-26 July 2006
Available from: 2008-06-18 Created: 2008-06-18 Last updated: 2018-03-13Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

No full text in DiVA

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http://www.lancs.ac.uk/fss/events/hecu3/papershecu3.htm

Authority records BETA

Steiner, LarsMorberg, Åsa

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Steiner, LarsMorberg, Åsa
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Ämnesavdelningen för byggnadskvalitetÄmnesavdelningen för didaktik
Business Administration

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CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard-cite-them-right
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • sv-SE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • de-DE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf