hig.sePublications
Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard-cite-them-right
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • sv-SE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • de-DE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Precision of measurements of physical workload during standardised manual handling: Part II : Inclinometry of head, upper back, neck and upper arms
Department of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, University Hospital, Lund, Sweden.
Department of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, University Hospital, Lund, Sweden.
Department of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, University Hospital, Lund, Sweden.
Department of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, University Hospital, Lund, Sweden.
Show others and affiliations
2006 (English)In: Journal of Electromyography & Kinesiology, ISSN 1050-6411, E-ISSN 1873-5711, Vol. 16, no 2, 125-136 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

For measuring the physical exposure/workload in studies of work-related musculoskeletal disorders, direct measurements are valuable. However, the between-days and between-subjects variability, as well as the precision of the method per se, are not well known. In a laboratory, six women performed three standardised assembly tasks, all of them repeated on three different days. Triaxial inclinometers were applied to the head, upper back and upper arms. Between-days (within subjects) and between-subjects (within tasks) variance components were derived for the 10th, 50th and 90th percentiles of the angular and the angular velocity distributions, and for the proportion of time spent in predefined angular sectors. For percentiles of the angular distributions, the average between-days variability was 3.4 degrees , and the between-subjects variability 4.0 degrees . For proportion of time spent in angular sectors, the variability depended on the percentage of time spent in the sector; the relative variability was scattered and large, on average 103% between days and 56% between subjects. For the angular velocity percentiles, the average between-days variability was 7.9%, and the average between-subjects variability was 22%. The contribution of the measurement procedure per se to the between-days variability, i.e., the imprecision of the method, was small: less than 2 degrees for angles and 3% for angular velocity.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2006. Vol. 16, no 2, 125-136 p.
Keyword [en]
Acceleration, Adult, Biomechanics, Female, Humans, Middle Aged, Movement/*physiology, Neck/*physiology, Posture/*physiology, Upper Extremity/*physiology, Workload
National Category
Environmental Health and Occupational Health
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-2798DOI: 10.1016/j.jelekin.2005.06.009ISI: 000236344200002PubMedID: 16102977Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-31644450925OAI: oai:DiVA.org:hig-2798DiVA: diva2:119460
Available from: 2007-11-28 Created: 2007-11-28 Last updated: 2016-12-05Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

No full text

Other links

Publisher's full textPubMedScopus

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Mathiassen, Svend Erik
By organisation
Centre for Musculoskeletal ResearchOccupational health science
In the same journal
Journal of Electromyography & Kinesiology
Environmental Health and Occupational Health

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

Altmetric score

Total: 707 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard-cite-them-right
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • sv-SE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • de-DE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf