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Meal patterns and meal quality in patients with leg ulcers
Department of Medicine and Care, Division of Nursing Science, Faculty of Health Sciences, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
Department of Medical Sciences, Nutrition Unit, Uppsala University, Sweden.
Department of Medicine and Care, Division of Nursing Science, Faculty of Health Sciences, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
Department of Medicine and Care, Division of Nursing Science, Faculty of Health Sciences, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
2000 (English)In: Journal of human nutrition and dietetics (Print), ISSN 0952-3871, E-ISSN 1365-277X, Vol. 13, no 1, p. 3-12Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background. Wound healing is a complex process, which requires adequate energy sources, proteins, and specific minerals and vitamins. If an individual is unable to get or to eat the nutrients required, the wound healing process might be disrupted. The aim of this study was to investigate food-related factors, meal patterns and meal quality in relation to nutritional status in elderly out-patients with leg ulcers. Methods. Nutritional status was assessed by use of the Mini Nutritional Assessment in 70 patients living in their own homes. Fifty-six of the patients recorded actual meals and snacks over four consecutive days. Meal patterns and meal quality were evaluated with the help of a qualitative classification system, the Food Based Concept for Classification of Eating Episodes. Results. Thirty-six patients were classified as well-nourished, 32 were at risk of malnutrition and two were malnourished. More patients in the risk group for malnutrition did not buy their own food, and usually ate alone. Incomplete Meals and Low Quality Snacks were the most common eating types. The patients at risk of malnutrition had significantly fewer prepared Complete Meals than the well-nourished patients. Conclusion. The results show a diet and meal quality which hardly meets the requirements for nutrients that are important in wound healing, especially for those patients assessed at risk of malnutrition.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2000. Vol. 13, no 1, p. 3-12
National Category
Other Health Sciences
Research subject
Health Science
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-26338DOI: 10.1046/j.1365-277X.2000.00207.xISI: 000085689300001Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-0034010978OAI: oai:DiVA.org:hig-26338DiVA, id: diva2:1195211
Available from: 2016-09-29 Created: 2018-04-04Bibliographically approved

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Lennernäs, Maria A.-C.

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