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The effects of inverting prisms on the horizontal-vertical illusion: a systematic effect of downward gaze
University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research. University of Gävle, Department of Education and Psychology, Ämnesavdelningen för folkhälsovetenskap. Department of Optometry and Optical Science, Faculty of Physics and Mathematics, University of Latvia, Riga, Latvia.
Department of Optometry and Optical Science, Faculty of Physics and Mathematics, University of Latvia, Riga, Latvia.
University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
2007 (English)In: Experimental Brain Research, ISSN 0014-4819, E-ISSN 1432-1106, Vol. 183, no 1, 9-15 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The purpose of this work is to compare the relative contributions from the extraocular and sensory systems on the magnitude of the horizontal-vertical illusion (HVI). The visual HVI refers to the general tendency to overestimate vertical extensions of small-scale lines on a picture plane relative to the horizontal by 4-16% depending on the method of measurement. The HVI line stimuli consisted of luminous vertical and horizontal lines forming "L-profiles" located in the frontoparallel plane at a 45 cm viewing distance, collinearly with a binocular gaze. The home position of gaze was aligned to the center of the screen with the ear-eye angle concordant with the environmental horizontal. Illusion strength was quantified when subjects fixated the HVI line stimuli in four quadrants of the visual field. The HVI was also viewed through prism lenses that inverted the retinal images by 180 degrees , thereby dissociating the sensory "up-down" direction from the oculomotor up-down frame of reference. The results revealed a systematically lower magnitude of the HVI in the bottom visual field regardless of whether subjects fixated the HVI with the distorting prisms or without. Taken together, these results suggest that the HVI is sensitive to small-angle gaze shifts. In agreement with several recent findings, these results are interpreted as implying that the brain imposes an enhanced analytic structure on the ascending sensory information during downward gaze.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2007. Vol. 183, no 1, 9-15 p.
Keyword [en]
Gaze; Horizontal vertical illusion; Prisms; Sensorimotor; Visual space
National Category
Environmental Health and Occupational Health
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-2878DOI: 10.1007/s00221-007-1015-zISI: 000249623500002PubMedID: 17609882Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-34648832287OAI: oai:DiVA.org:hig-2878DiVA: diva2:119540
Available from: 2007-11-28 Created: 2007-11-28 Last updated: 2016-10-28Bibliographically approved

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