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The human body may buffer small differences in meal size and timing during a 24-h wake period provided energy balance is maintained
Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism, Uppsala University, Department of Medical Sciences, Nutrition, Uppsala University Hospital.
Stockholm University, Stress Research Institute, Institutet för psykosocial medicin (IPM), Avdelningen för stressforskning, Karolinska institutet.
Department of Medical Sciences, Nutrition, Uppsala University Hospital.
Department of Biosciences, Unit for Preventive Nutrition, Karolinska Institute.
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2003 (English)In: Journal of Nutrition, ISSN 0022-3166, E-ISSN 1541-6100, Vol. 133, no 9, p. 2748-2755Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Because ∼20% of the work force in the industrialized world have irregular working hours, it is pertinent to study the consequences of eating at irregular, especially nighttime hours. We studied the postprandial responses during nocturnal fasting vs. e+ating throughout a 24-h wake period. Seven healthy males were studied twice in a crossover design. After a 6-d diet adjustment period [high fat diet, 45 energy percent (en%) fat, 40 en% carbohydrates)] with sleep from 2300 to 0700 h, the men were kept awake for 24 h at the metabolic ward and given either 6 isoenergetic meals, i.e., every 4 h (N-eat) or 4 isoenergetic meals from 0800 to 2000 h followed by a nocturnal fast (N-fast), with the same 24-h energy intake. Energy expenditure, substrate utilization, activity, heat release, body temperature and blood variables were measured over 24 h. Energy expenditure and blood glucose, triacylglycerol, insulin and glucagon concentrations were lower and nonesterified fatty acids concentrations were higher during the nocturnal fast than during nocturnal eating (P < 0.05); however, no 24-h differences between the protocols were apparent. Nocturnal fasting slightly altered the secretory patterns of the thyroid hormones and cortisol (P < 0.05). We found no clear indication that it would be more favorable to ingest few larger daytime meals than smaller meals throughout the 24-h period. The body seems to be able to buffer small differences in meal size and timing provided energy balance is maintained

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2003. Vol. 133, no 9, p. 2748-2755
Keywords [en]
Circadian, Endocrine variables, Energy expenditure, Postprandial, Substrate utilization
National Category
Other Health Sciences
Research subject
Health Science
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-26323PubMedID: 12949360Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-0042920810OAI: oai:DiVA.org:hig-26323DiVA, id: diva2:1195753
Available from: 2016-09-29 Created: 2018-04-06Bibliographically approved

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