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Alternations between physical and cognitivetasks in repetitive work – Effect of cognitive task difficulty on fatigue development
University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, Occupational health science. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-4283-4199
University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, Occupational health science. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.ORCID iD: 0000-0003-1443-6211
University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, Occupational health science. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-2741-1868
2018 (English)In: Ergonomics, ISSN 0014-0139, E-ISSN 1366-5847Article in journal (Refereed) Submitted
Abstract [en]

In a context of job rotation, the present study determined the extent to which the difficulty of a cognitive task (CT) interspersed between bouts of repetitive, low-force work influence recovery.

Fifteen female participants performed three experimental sessions with 10 repeats of a 7min+3min combination of physical and cognitive tasks (CT). The CT was either easy, moderate or hard. During sessions, muscle activity was recorded using surface electromyography, and participants rated fatigue and pain.

Muscle activity and ratings of perceived fatigue increased during work. Cognitive task difficulty influenced fatigue development marginally, apart from forearm extensor EMG increasing slower with the hard CT.  During the CT periods, EMG and perceived fatigue partly recovered, and to the same extent with all three CT difficulties.

In conclusion, CT difficulty had marginal effects on recovery from fatigue and may, thus, not be a critical issue in job rotation schemes with alternating physical and cognitive tasks.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2018.
Keywords [en]
Repetitive work, fatigue, recovery, physical load, mental load, variation
National Category
Occupational Health and Environmental Health
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-26536OAI: oai:DiVA.org:hig-26536DiVA, id: diva2:1203604
Funder
AFA Insurance, 120223Available from: 2018-05-03 Created: 2018-05-03 Last updated: 2018-05-21Bibliographically approved

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Mixter, SusannaMathiassen, Svend ErikHallman, David

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CiteExportLink to record
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Citation style
  • apa
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