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Rethinking Autism, Theism, and Atheism: Bodiless Agents and Imaginary Realities
University of Gävle, Faculty of Education and Business Studies, Department of Humanities, Religious studies.
2018 (English)In: Archive for the Psychology of Religion/ Archiv für Religionspsychologie, ISSN 0084-6724, E-ISSN 1573-6121, Vol. 40, no 1, p. 1-31Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This anthropologically informed study explores descriptions of communication with invisible, superhuman agents in high functioning young adults on the autism spectrum. Based on material from interviews, two hypotheses are formulated. First, autistic individuals may experience communication with bodiless agents (e.g., gods, angels, and spirits) as less complex than interaction with peers, since it is unrestricted by multisensory input, such as body language, facial expressions, and intonation. Second, descriptions of how participants absorb into “imaginary realities” suggest that such mental states are desirable due to qualities that facilitate social cognition: While the empirical world comes through as fragmented and incoherent, imaginary worlds offer predictability, emotional coherence, and benevolent minds. These results do not conform to popular expectations that autistic minds are less adapted to experience supernatural agents, and it is instead argued that imaginative, autistic individuals may embrace religious and fictive agents in search for socially and emotionally comprehensible interaction.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2018. Vol. 40, no 1, p. 1-31
Keywords [en]
religion; autism; superhuman agents; mentalizing abilities; imagination; emotional coherence; fantasy proneness; multisensory binding
National Category
Religious Studies
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-26609DOI: 10.1163/15736121-12341348ISI: 000434436000001Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-85048224782OAI: oai:DiVA.org:hig-26609DiVA, id: diva2:1209336
Available from: 2018-05-22 Created: 2018-05-22 Last updated: 2018-07-05Bibliographically approved

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Visuri, Ingela

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CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

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Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard-cite-them-right
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • sv-SE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • de-DE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf