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‘Are we to become a gender university?’ Facets of resistance to a gender equality project
Department of Urban and Rural Development, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Sweden.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-6898-1285
Department of Ethnology, History of Religions and Gender Studies, Stockholm University, Sweden.ORCID iD: 0000-0001-7108-2275
University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Building, Energy and Environmental Engineering, Environmental engineering.
2018 (English)In: Gender, Work and Organization, ISSN 0968-6673, E-ISSN 1468-0432, Vol. 25, no 2, p. 127-143Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Gender equality (GE) is something ‘we cannot not want’. Indeed, the pursuit of equal rights, responsibilities and opportunities for all women and men throughout a society freed from gendered oppression is widely visible in recent organizational GE initiatives. In practice, however, GE initiatives often fail in challenging gendered norms and at effecting deep-seated change. In fact, GE measures tend to encounter resistance, with a gap between saying and doing. Using a GE project at a Swedish university, we examined the changing nature of reactions to GE objectives seeking to understand why gender inequality persists in academia. We used ‘resistance’ to identify multiple, complex reactions to the project, focusing on the discursive practices of GE. Focusing our contextual analysis on change and changes in reactions enabled a process-oriented analysis that revealed gaps where change is possible. Thus, we argue that studying change makes it possible to identify points in time where gendered discriminatory norms are more likely to occur. However, analysing discursive practices does not itself lead to change nor to action. Rather, demands for change must start with answering, in a collaborative way, what problem we are trying to solve when we start a new GE project, in order to be relevant to the specific context. Otherwise, GE risks being the captive of consensus politics and gender inequality will persist.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Blackwell Publishing Ltd , 2018. Vol. 25, no 2, p. 127-143
Keywords [en]
academia, gender equality, meritocracy, resistance, gender issue, gender role, human rights, politics, university sector, Sweden
National Category
Other Social Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-26746DOI: 10.1111/gwao.12204ISI: 000429418400003Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-85032180553OAI: oai:DiVA.org:hig-26746DiVA, id: diva2:1213154
Available from: 2018-06-04 Created: 2018-06-04 Last updated: 2018-06-04Bibliographically approved

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Hussénius, Anita

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