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Using resilience engineering to manage school violence
University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Social Work and Psychology, Criminology.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-8186-3662
2018 (English)In: The Stockholm Criminology Symposium: Program & Abstracts, Stockholm: The Swedish National Council for Crime Prevention (Brå) , 2018, p. 172-172Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Safety has never been as bureaucratized as it is today. Over the past two decades we have seen the blooming of safety rules and legislation, and schools do not follow short. But at the same time, since the Columbine High School massacre set off a nationwide moral panic in 1999, there have been ten school shootings in which four or more people were killed. Including the death or suicide of the perpetrators, these mass shootings have resulted in 122 fatalities. In order to prevent school violence, several safety measures have been created. However, school violence has not disappeared and ranges from severe and lethal incidents such as the events this year in Florida, Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School to more lenient but still unwanted forms making everyday school life difficult for students and staff members alike. This project discusses the insights from the so-called resilience engineering school, and apply these understandings to how school violence is managed. The theory suggests that remarkable safety performance on minor incidents tends to increase the risk of events of larger magnitude. By eradicating the minor events through tightening safety protocols, the possibility to learn from these events is lost, together with the full potential of human resourcefulness that could be harnessed towards creating safety success. Thus, safety research has shown that the link between minor and major accidents is not always there. It questions the “theory” of broken windows, which seems to be the general idea behind many school violence prevention approaches, that is, by controlling every minor occurrence of school violence, more severe school violence could be prevented.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Stockholm: The Swedish National Council for Crime Prevention (Brå) , 2018. p. 172-172
Keywords [en]
Violence prevention
National Category
Sociology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-26876OAI: oai:DiVA.org:hig-26876DiVA, id: diva2:1215693
Conference
The Stockholm Criminology Symposium, 12–14 June 2018, Stockholm, Sweden
Projects
Projekt SF 16 155
Note

Projektet är finansierat av stiftelsen Clas Groschinskys minnesfond

Available from: 2018-06-08 Created: 2018-06-08 Last updated: 2018-06-11Bibliographically approved

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CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard-cite-them-right
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • sv-SE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • de-DE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf