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Knee pain in nursing home workers after implementation of a safe resident handling program
University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, Occupational health science. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research. Gold Standard Research Consulting, Bryn Mawr, Pennsylvania, USA.ORCID iD: 0000-0003-1062-0134
Center for the Promotion of Health in the New England Workplace, University of Massachusetts Lowell, Massachusetts, USA.
Center for the Promotion of Health in the New England Workplace, University of Massachusetts Lowell, Massachusetts, USA.
Center for the Promotion of Health in the New England Workplace, University of Massachusetts Lowell, Massachusetts, USA.
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2018 (English)In: American Journal of Industrial Medicine, ISSN 0271-3586, E-ISSN 1097-0274, Vol. 61, no 10, p. 849-860Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Purpose: Approximately 25-30% of nursing personnel experience knee pain (KP). We sought to identify physical and psychosocial work exposures, and personal factors related to prevalent, incident, and persistent KP 5-8 years after safe resident handing program (SRHP) implementation in nursing homes.

Methods: Health and exposure information was obtained from worker surveys 5-6 years (“F5”) and 7-8 years (“F6”) post-SRHP implementation. Prevalent KP correlates were examined at F5; persistent and incident KP predictors were analyzed at F6, utilizing robust Poisson multivariable regression.

Results: F5 KP prevalence (19.7%) was associated with combined physical exposures, and with either high job strain or low social support, in separate models. Two-year persistent KP was similarly associated with these psychosocial exposures. Being overweight was associated with KP in all analyses.

Conclusions: The SRHP program did not eliminate knee physical loading, which should be reduced to prevent nursing home worker KP. Workplace psychosocial exposures (high job strain, low social support) also appeared germane.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2018. Vol. 61, no 10, p. 849-860
Keywords [en]
healthcare workers, job strain, lower extremity, moving and lifting patients, workload
National Category
Occupational Health and Environmental Health
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-27900DOI: 10.1002/ajim.22902ISI: 000444537500007PubMedID: 30156000Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-85052819710OAI: oai:DiVA.org:hig-27900DiVA, id: diva2:1247854
Note

Funding information

U.S. National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH/CDC), Grant number: U19-OH008857

Available from: 2018-09-13 Created: 2018-09-13 Last updated: 2018-10-15Bibliographically approved

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Gold, Judith E.

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