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Traditional Conservation Practices
Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden; Beijer International Institute of Ecological Economics, Stockholm, Sweden.
Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden; Beijer International Institute of Ecological Economics, Stockholm, Sweden.ORCID iD: 0000-0001-7644-7448
2013 (English)In: Encyclopedia of Biodiversity: Second Edition, Elsevier, 2013, 2, p. 226-235Chapter in book (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

People have inhabited terrestrial ecosystems of the world for thousands of years. Both resource management systems and cosmological belief systems have evolved and continue to develop. In fact, most, if not all, ecosystems and biodiversity have been altered by humans to various degrees (. Nelson and Serafin, 1992). The human imprint has in many cases wiped out species and caused substantial land use change (e.g., Turner et al., 1990; Wilson, 1992). However, there are practices of local peoples of both traditional and contemporary society that contribute to biodiversity conservation, practices that are more common than generally recognized (. Berkes and Folke, 1998). For example, throughout the Amazonian tropics, scientists have found remnants of past agricultural management systems in landscapes previously believed to be free from human imprint, suggesting that such management systems were highly adapted to natural cycles of forest regeneration (. Balée, 1992; Posey, 1992).

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2013, 2. p. 226-235
Keywords [en]
Biological resources, Conservation Practices, Future generations, High human population, Local resource users, Natural disturbance, Rain forest areas, Resilience, Traditional ecological knowledge, Traditional peoples
National Category
Environmental Sciences related to Agriculture and Land-use
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-28153DOI: 10.1016/B978-0-12-384719-5.00144-1Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-85042817757ISBN: 9780123847195 (print)ISBN: 9780123847201 (electronic)OAI: oai:DiVA.org:hig-28153DiVA, id: diva2:1254723
Available from: 2018-10-10 Created: 2018-10-10 Last updated: 2018-11-26Bibliographically approved

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Colding, Johan

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CiteExportLink to record
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Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard-cite-them-right
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
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  • Other style
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  • sv-SE
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  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • de-DE
  • Other locale
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Output format
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