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Regional assessment of Europe
Department of International Economics, Faculty of Economics and Sociology, University of Lodz, Lodz, Poland.
Urban and Regional Planning Department, İstanbul Technical University (ITU), Taskisla, Istanbul, Turkey.
Department of Geography, Humboldt Universität zu Berlin, Berlin, Germany; Department of Comuptational Landscape Ecology, UFZ Centre for Environmental Research – UFZ, Leipzig, Germany.
Beijer International Institute of Ecological Economics, Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences, Stockholm, Sweden; Stockholm Resilience Centre, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.ORCID iD: 0000-0001-7644-7448
2013 (English)In: Urbanization, Biodiversity and Ecosystem Services: Challenges and Opportunities: A Global Assessment / [ed] Thomas Elmqvist, Michail Fragkias, Julie Goodness, Burak Güneralp, Peter J. Marcotullio, Robert I. McDonald, Susan Parnell, Maria Schewenius, Marte Sendstad, Karen C. Seto, and Cathy Wilkinson, Springer Netherlands , 2013, 1, p. 275-278Chapter in book (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

In many of the areas presently occupied by European cities, settlements were formed already in Neolithic times, when the continent was colonized by agri culturalists (9500 B.C. onwards). The re-colonization of European plants and animals after the last Ice Age, which covered large areas of Europe, was not completed before human infl uence began to cause local disturbances, meaning that the native biodiversity has evolved under human infl uence. The long history of urban development in Europe, and the location of cities in fertile river valleys, are at least two reasons of why many European cities are often characterized by higher species richness of plants and animals than some of the surrounding rural areas. The long history of co-evolution may be a particular factor explaining why European plants and animals worldwide tend to successfully establish in areas with dense human population.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer Netherlands , 2013, 1. p. 275-278
Keywords [en]
Ecosystem Service, Green Space European City, Urban Ecology, Urban Gardening
National Category
Environmental Sciences related to Agriculture and Land-use
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-28155DOI: 10.1007/978-94-007-7088-1_13Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-84901467600ISBN: 9789400770881 (electronic)ISBN: 9789400770874 (print)OAI: oai:DiVA.org:hig-28155DiVA, id: diva2:1254742
Available from: 2018-10-10 Created: 2018-10-10 Last updated: 2018-11-26Bibliographically approved

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Colding, Johan

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