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Family caregivers experiences of the pre-diagnostic stage in frontotemporal dementia
Clinic for Mental Health and Substance Abuse, Nord-Trøndelag Hospital Trust, Namsos Hospital, Norway; Department of Mental Health, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Norway.
Mid Sweden University, Mid Sweden University, Sweden.
Clinic for Mental Health and Substance Abuse, Nord-Trøndelag Hospital Trust, Namsos Hospital, Norway; Department of Mental Health, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Norway.
University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Caring Science, Caring Science. (Det goda åldrandet)
2019 (English)In: Geriatric Nursing, ISSN 0197-4572, E-ISSN 1528-3984, Vol. 40, no 3, p. 246-251Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Frontotemporal dementia (FTD) is a neurodegenerative disease with symptoms that differs from other dementias. Commonly early symptoms in FTD are changes in personality and behavior, which can be interpreted as psychiatric disease. The delay in FTD diagnosis contributes to the burden of family caregivers. Therefore, it is important to have more knowledge about the pre-diagnostic stage. In this qualitative interview study, we explored fourteen family caregiver's experiences of the pre-diagnostic stage of frontotemporal dementia (FTD). Our findings suggest that the family caregivers experienced the pre-diagnostic stage of FTD as changes in the interpersonal relationship with their loved one. These changes were often subtle and difficult for family caregivers to explain to others. The findings from our study illuminate the importance of medical staff paying attention when a next of kin is concerned about subtle changes in a loved one. The findings also illuminate that awareness of FTD should be raised.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2019. Vol. 40, no 3, p. 246-251
National Category
Health Sciences
Research subject
Health-Promoting Work
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-28700DOI: 10.1016/j.gerinurse.2018.10.006ISI: 000474332200003PubMedID: 30424902Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-85056274633OAI: oai:DiVA.org:hig-28700DiVA, id: diva2:1266546
Available from: 2018-11-28 Created: 2018-11-28 Last updated: 2021-04-01Bibliographically approved

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Enmarker, Ingela

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CiteExportLink to record
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Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard-cite-them-right
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
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Language
  • sv-SE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • de-DE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf