hig.sePublications
Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard-cite-them-right
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • sv-SE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • de-DE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Novel biodegradation of vanillin by a woodinhabiting isolate of Cystobasidium sp.
University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Building, Energy and Environmental Engineering, Environmental engineering.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-8895-5631
University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Building, Energy and Environmental Engineering, Environmental engineering.ORCID iD: 0000-0003-2366-2931
2018 (English)In: Book of abstracts: International Specialized Symposium on Yeasts ISSY 34, 2018, p. 114-114Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Cystobasidium species are mostly found in temperate or cold environments. They have been isolated from a wide range of habitats: plants, soils, rocks, aquatic environments and indoor dust. The genus Cystobasidium mainly consists of species of red yeasts in the Rhodotorula minuta clade. These basidiomycetous yeast species are commonly found in temperate to cold regions. In the present study, two strains of Cystobasidium sp. were isolated from decaying wood of housing on the Faroe Islands, where the average yearly temperature ranges from 2°C to 13°C. The sequences of the two strains had two identical gaps within the ITS1ހ5.8SހITS2 region and a second gap within the D1/D2 LSU unit, when aligned to those of C. laryngis CBS 2221, their closest match. The isolates were designated as Cystobasidium sp. Both isolates converted vanillin into vanillyl alcohol in the presence of oxygen. The biotransformation of vanillin into vanillyl alcohol has been documented for only a few species of fungi, but to our knowledge, it has not previously been reported for any basidiomycetous yeast species. Rhodotorula rubra, a distantly related basidiomycetous yeast converts vanillin into vanillic acid. In the present study, the two isolates of Cystobasidium sp. did not produce any trace of vanillic acid, as determined by LC-MS, 1HހNMR and GC. Oxidizing vanillin into vanillic acid should be preferred by the fungi, since it results in more chemical energy, as compared to reducing it to vanillyl alcohol. The fungus may choose this pathway to escape the toxicity of both vanillin and vanillic acid. Vanillin has antimicrobial activity, and vanillic acid is more toxic than vanillyl alcohol. Vanillin is a constituent of the lignin molecule. Cystobasidium species are commonly found in the phyllosphere. Their ability to utilize plant chemicals should render them successful competitors on plants and wood.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2018. p. 114-114
National Category
Biological Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-28739OAI: oai:DiVA.org:hig-28739DiVA, id: diva2:1267474
Conference
34th International Specialized Symposium on Yeasts, ISSY 34; Bariloche, Patagonia, Argentina; 1-4 October 2018
Available from: 2018-12-03 Created: 2018-12-03 Last updated: 2018-12-11Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

No full text in DiVA

Authority records BETA

Wright, Sandra A. I.Rönnander, Jonas

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Wright, Sandra A. I.Rönnander, Jonas
By organisation
Environmental engineering
Biological Sciences

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

urn-nbn

Altmetric score

urn-nbn
Total: 67 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard-cite-them-right
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • sv-SE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • de-DE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf