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Stress, energy and psychosocial conditions in different types of call centres
University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Building, Energy and Environmental Engineering. (LTP)
Karolinska Institutet, Institute of Environmental Medicine, Sweden.
Örebro University, Department of Public Health Sciences, Sweden.
Karolinska Institutet, NASP, Sweden.
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2010 (English)In: Work: A journal of Prevention, Assesment and rehabilitation, ISSN 1051-9815, E-ISSN 1875-9270, Vol. 36, no 1, 9-25 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The aim of this study was to identify risk indicators for high stress and low mental energy as well as to describe psychosocial working conditions at different types of call centres.

A cross sectional questionnaire study was conducted among 1183 operators from 28 call centres, in Sweden both external and internal, with different levels of task complexity, ownership and geographical location.

The stress level was moderately high and the energy level fairly high. Stress levels tended to be lower and psychosocial conditions better with increasing level of task complexity. Fourteen per cent of the operators were in a state of high stress/low energy (“worn out”) and 47% in high stress/high energy (“committed under pressure”). Operators in a state of low stress/high energy (“committed without pressure”) were most likely to report a better health status. High stress and lack of energy was mainly associated with time pressure, low decision latitude, and lack of social and supervisor support.

Time pressure in combination with lack of support and influence should be seen as a potential high risk situation for the development of a “worn-out” state among call centre operators. Management should make use of this knowledge in order to promote a long lasting efficient and healthy call centre work.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2010. Vol. 36, no 1, 9-25 p.
Keyword [en]
call centre, stress, work motivation, Working conditions
National Category
Environmental Health and Occupational Health
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-3459DOI: 10.3233/WOR-2010-1003ISI: 000279924600003Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-77954767383OAI: oai:DiVA.org:hig-3459DiVA: diva2:133060
Available from: 2009-01-07 Created: 2009-01-07 Last updated: 2016-07-04Bibliographically approved

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CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

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Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard-cite-them-right
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • sv-SE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • de-DE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf