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Sleep during pelvic-abdominal radiotherapy for cancer: a longitudinal study with special attention to sleep in relation to nausea and quality of life
Karolinska Institutet; Haukeland University Hospital, Bergen, Norway.
University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Caring Science, Caring Science.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-3668-3857
2021 (English)In: Cancer Nursing, ISSN 0162-220X, E-ISSN 1538-9804, Vol. 44, no 4, p. 333-344Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: Poor sleep, nausea, psychological distress, and a lowered quality of life are common during radiotherapy for cancer. There is a lack of studies on the relationship between radiotherapy-induced nausea and sleep. This longitudinal study analyzes data from 196 patients who underwent pelvic-abdominal radiotherapy for cancer.

OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to investigate sleep parameters weekly before, during, and after radiotherapy in relation to nausea and other patient characteristics, clinical characteristics, psychological distress, and quality of life.

METHODS: Patients (n = 196, 84% women; mean age, 63 years; 68% had gynecological tumor, 28% had colorectal tumor, and 4% had other tumors) longitudinally answered questionnaires before, during, and after their radiotherapy over the abdominal and pelvic fields.

RESULTS: Poor sleep was experienced by 30% of the participants, and sleep (quality and difficulty falling asleep) improved during and after treatment compared with baseline. Experiencing nausea during treatment was associated with worse sleep quality during radiotherapy. Baseline anxiety was associated with worse sleep quality before, during, and after treatment. Poor sleep was associated with worse quality of life.

CONCLUSION: Nausea, more than a number of other variables, is a possible predictor of poor sleep in patients during radiotherapy for cancer.

IMPLICATIONS FOR PRACTICE: The results indicate that effectively managing nausea may be important for sleep quality, and possibly quality of life, in patients undergoing radiotherapy for cancer. More research is needed before recommendations for practice can be made.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Wolters Kluwer, 2021. Vol. 44, no 4, p. 333-344
National Category
Health Sciences
Research subject
Health-Promoting Work
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-32284DOI: 10.1097/NCC.0000000000000826ISI: 000669245600018PubMedID: 32371667Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-85109651260OAI: oai:DiVA.org:hig-32284DiVA, id: diva2:1429099
Available from: 2020-05-08 Created: 2020-05-08 Last updated: 2022-12-01Bibliographically approved

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Efverman, Anna

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CiteExportLink to record
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Citation style
  • apa
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