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Urban polluted forest soils induce elevated root peroxidase activity in Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) seedlings
University of Gävle, Department of Mathematics, Natural and Computer Sciences, Ämnesavdelningen för datavetenskap.ORCID iD: 0000-0001-9933-8308
2002 (English)In: Environmental Pollution, ISSN 0269-7491, E-ISSN 1873-6424, Vol. 116, no 2, p. 273-278Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Plant biomass, mycorrhizal status and root peroxidase activity were measured in ectomycorrhizal Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) seedlings grown in urban polluted and native, non-polluted forest soils with added ammonium or potassium sulphates simulating N and S deposition of urban areas. Peroxidase activity in the fine roots of seedlings planted in polluted forest soils was higher than in those planted in non-polluted soils and correlated positively with the activities measured in an earlier study in the roots of mature Scots pines growing at the sites from where the soils were collected. Growth of seedlings and mycorrhizal status were not affected by the origin of soil. Exposing the seedlings to winter acclimation conditions for 6 weeks elevated peroxidase activity in the roots. The addition of ammonium or potassium sulphate to non-polluted soils did not induce elevated root peroxidase activity, although at the levels of 0.5 and 1.0 g of ammonium sulphate a slight increasing trend was observed. We suggest, that indirect biotic factors, i.e. changes in the community structure of soil fungi, early stages of recognition, and defence reactions of pine roots against saprophytic and pathogenic fungi may be participating in the elicitation of peroxidase (POD) activity, although the possible role of heavy metals cannot be excluded.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2002. Vol. 116, no 2, p. 273-278
Keywords [en]
Ectomycorrhizal fungi, Pinus sylvestris, Root peroxidase activity, Urban pollution
National Category
Biological Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-35342DOI: 10.1016/S0269-7491(01)00126-9PubMedID: 11806455Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-0036131551OAI: oai:DiVA.org:hig-35342DiVA, id: diva2:1531429
Available from: 2021-02-26 Created: 2021-02-26 Last updated: 2022-09-19Bibliographically approved

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Ahonen-Jonnarth, Ulla

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