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Self-efficacy improved after neonatal resuscitation teamtraining
University of Gävle, Department of Caring Sciences and Sociology, Ämnesavdelningen för vårdvetenskap.
University of Gävle, Department of Caring Sciences and Sociology, Ämnesavdelningen för vårdvetenskap.
2009 (English)In: Self-efficacy improved after neonatal resuscitation teamtraining, 2009Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Handling neonatal resuscitation requires optimal team functioning. A team must be composed of individuals who have specifically assigned roles and responsibilities. Each team member should acknowledge the role of the other team members, communicate respectfully, and recognize the leader's role (1).Systematic training in simulation of realistic situations can contribute to that the multi-disciplinary team maintains and improves their competence and quality of treatment in critical situations (2).

Training scenarios coupled with debriefings provide rich learning experiences for all the team members who are involved in neonatal resuscitation (3).

The purpose of this study was to examine how the staff considered the teamwork in neonatal resuscitation at a small Swedish hospital and if it existed any differences between they who had participated in simulator-based training. The study was directed to all the staff involved in the neonatal resuscitation team, i.e. pediatricians, obstetricians, anaesthetists, midwives and nurses who works in a NICU.

A questionnaire was distributed to a total of 92 staff members with a response tale of 61% (n=56). Two groups were identified, one who has implemented simulator-based training and one who hadn't. The result showed that they who had participated in simulator-based team training in neonatal resuscitation:

- are more prepared for neonatal resuscitation situations.-   have greater opportunity to influence decisions, -   other team members took advantage of their skills, -   had greater knowledge of what is required of them in an neonatal resuscitation situation.

Neonatal resuscitation is one of the classic low-frequency, high risk event that lends itself well to simulator-based training (3).   In a smaller hospital the neonatal resuscitation is infrequent but parents still expect optimal treatment. To participate in the rarely recurring situations require not only skills and knowledge but also the ability to work in a team. It is both an organizational, educational and medical challenge to keep the medical safety in resuscitation situations, especially because they are infrequent (2).The authors believe that it is a need to develop better methods to evaluate the impact of simulator training.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2009.
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-4738OAI: oai:DiVA.org:hig-4738DiVA: diva2:223821
Conference
IPSSW 2009, Second international congress in pediatric simulation, Florence, Italy, April 22-23, 2009
Note

Oral presentation

Available from: 2009-06-15 Created: 2009-06-15 Last updated: 2013-09-19Bibliographically approved

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CiteExportLink to record
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Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard-cite-them-right
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
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  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • sv-SE
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  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
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  • asciidoc
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