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Differences in muscle load between computer and non-computer work among office workers
University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research. University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences. Department of Neuroscience Erasmus MC, Rotterdam, Netherlands.
University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research. University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences.ORCID iD: 0000-0003-1443-6211
Department of Neuroscience Erasmus MC, Rotterdam, Netherlands.
Department of Neuroscience Erasmus MC, Rotterdam, Netherlands.
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2009 (English)In: Ergonomics, ISSN 0014-0139, E-ISSN 1366-5847, Vol. 52, no 12, p. 1540-1555Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Introduction of more non-computer tasks has been suggested to increase exposure variation and thus reduce musculoskeletal complaints (MSC) in computer-intensive office work. This study investigated whether muscle activity did, indeed, differ between computer and non-computer activities. Whole-day logs of input device use in 30 office workers were used to identify computer and non-computer activities, using a range of classification thresholds (NCTs). Exposure during these activities was assessed by bilateral electromyography recordings from the upper trapezius and lower arm. Contrasts in muscle activity between computer and noncomputer activities were distinct but small, even at the individualized, optimal NCT. Using an average groupbased NCT resulted in less contrast, also if stratified by subgroups (job function, MSC). Computer activity logs should be used cautiously as proxies of biomechanical exposure. Conventional non-computer tasks may have a limited potential to increase exposure variation in computer-intensive office work.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2009. Vol. 52, no 12, p. 1540-1555
Keywords [en]
health risks, individual differences, work scheduling, office ergonomics, computer workstations
National Category
Occupational Health and Environmental Health
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-5189DOI: 10.1080/00140130903199905ISI: 000272136300008Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-74849086095OAI: oai:DiVA.org:hig-5189DiVA, id: diva2:233722
Available from: 2009-09-02 Created: 2009-09-02 Last updated: 2018-03-13Bibliographically approved

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Mathiassen, Svend Erik

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