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Business and Development in Africa
University of Gävle, Department of Business Administration and Economics, Ämnesavdelningen för företagsekonomi.
Texas Southern University, Houston, Texas, USA.
Högskolan i Halmstad.
Hampton University, Hampton, Virginia, USA.
2009 (English)Collection (editor) (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

A SPECIAL EDITION ON BUSINESS AND DEVELOPMENT IN AFRICA: Changes in the global economic landscape, the comparatively unrestrained flow of resources across the boundaries of nation states, as well as, the growing expansion of the overseas activities of many companies through out the world has stimulated an increased interest in examining business strategies. Africa, along with China, is in the forefront of current global business discussions. Once discounted, to “third world” status, discoveries of large quantities of oil have made Africa a player in the global economy. While these discoveries add to the comparative advantages of African countries, the intense competition brought on by globalization and trade liberalization, trade liberalization and the integration of of world markets challenge us to critically examine the ways in which African countries can contribute to trade and socio-economic growth globally, and the impact of such locally. Comprising a part of the world economy that has approximately 900 million people and 52 nations, Africa represents, potentially some of the most important growth opportunities in today’s economy. A diverse group of economies and societies, developing nations, in general and African countries, in particular are an important testing ground for our existing theories, models and concepts of business and management. In addition, they offer the opportunity for the development of new theoretical contributions in the field of management and business studies.

The goal of this special edition is to provide a forum on the latest thinking about business and development in Africa.  This includes the growing paradox between development and the appropriation of resources; and between globalization and local development.

The volume has been developed around several issues with papers in each area. A seminal work looks at early African contributions, particularly those of Ibn Khaldun, to theories of economic development which are based on competitive rather than monopoly capitalism and proposes policy implications. The role of intra-region trade is examined in a paper considering the effects of consumer ethnocentrism on trade between Mozambique and South Africa. Several papers in the edition address business and development in Sub-Saharan Africa, West Africa, South Africa and the COMESA region. Development is examined with respect to: Foreign Direct Investment flows and their effects on GDP, making use of growth accounting frameworks, the impact of trade liberalization and globalization on competition, the challenges facing entrepreneurs, and trends in the exchange rate in West African Economic and Monetary Union. The example of Botswana which has made great strides in transparency, GDP growth and literacy allowing it to become a model of good governance is presented. Other papers examine the importance of agricultural production for household security and income stability and some of the technical barriers which limit trade between African and European countries. The commercial production of medicinal plants and its potential for the semi-arid regions of Kenya is discussed. Another set of papers uses behavioral measures to understand business success: the knowledge transfer process and the motivation to perform are considered with respect to turnover and manager’s intention to stay, social performance measures are proposed. In addition to financial performance measures, and the social capabilities of African firms is suggested to be an important factor for narrowing the economic gap between African economies and other parts of the world.

The edition includes perspectives on diverse issues. Together, they enrich our understanding of business in Africa and broaden the discussion of development and Africa´s place in the world economy.

Thanks to the editors and their respective universities: Dr. Aihie Osarenkhoe of the University of Gävle, Dr. Gabriel Awuah of Halmstad University, and Dr. Sid Howard Credle of Hampton University.

Sincerely,

Professor C.B. Claiborne, Ph.D, Editor in Chief for International Journal of Business Research, Texas Southern University, Houston, Texas, USA.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
International Academy of Business and Economics , 2009. , 174 p.
Series
International journal of business research, ISSN 1555-1296 ; 2009:9:3 Special edition
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-5502OAI: oai:DiVA.org:hig-5502DiVA: diva2:236611
Available from: 2009-09-24 Created: 2009-09-24 Last updated: 2011-10-02Bibliographically approved

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CiteExportLink to record
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Citation style
  • apa
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