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Price versus precision cost efficiency in trunk posture observation (Poster)
University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research. University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences.
University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research. University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences.ORCID iD: 0000-0003-1443-6211
University of British Columbia School of Population and Public Health, Vancouver, Canada.
University of British Columbia School of Population and Public Health, Vancouver, Canada.
2010 (English)Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Aims There is a long-acknowledged tradeoff between precision and cost of exposure assessment strategies (Winkel and Mathiassen, 1994), but a dearth of literature quantifying this tradeoff. This study compares different sampling strategies for trunk posture observation with respect to monetary costs and statistical efficiency. Methods Experts observed 126 workers in heavy industry during full work shifts, with repeated measures on 76% of workers. The observed percentage of time spent with trunk flexed more than 60 degrees was recorded and summarized for each work day using the Back-EST sampling method (Village et al 2009). A model of costs associated with the data sampling strategy was developed using previously published data (Trask et al 2007), accounting for the costs of recruiting companies and workers, and of observing full work shifts. Statistical performance was described as standard error of the mean (SEM). Post hoc, a selection of sampling strategies were simulated to demonstrate the empirical trade-off between cost and efficiency for different sampling strategies. Results: Figure 1 shows the family of curves resulting when 1 to 10 workers are measured 1 to 4 times within a single company. The SEM declines steeply for the first few additional subjects, while further subjects increase costs considerably with no substantial improvements in precision. Adding repeated measures generally increased costs with smaller gains in precision. Discussion/conclusions: This study informs design of posture observation sampling campaigns; the ‘mesh’ of sampling strategies in the figure demonstrates the maximum precision level that can be achieved for a given cost, as well as the minimum cost for a given level of precision. This allows researchers to make informed decisions on the use of limited resources when designing ergonomic studies

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Angers, France, 2010.
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-7482OAI: oai:DiVA.org:hig-7482DiVA: diva2:349248
Conference
Premus 2010 (Seventh International Conference on Prevention of Work-Related Musculoskeletal Disorders) August 29-September 2
Available from: 2010-09-06 Created: 2010-09-06 Last updated: 2014-11-11Bibliographically approved

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CiteExportLink to record
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Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard-cite-them-right
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • sv-SE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • de-DE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
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  • asciidoc
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