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Optimising sampling strategies: components of low-back EMG variability in five heavy industries
University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, CBF. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
School of Environmental Health, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada; School of Population and Public Health, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada.
Simon Fraser University School of Kinesiology, Burnaby, Canada.
Department of Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences, University of Washington, Seattle, WA, United States.
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2010 (English)In: Occupational and Environmental Medicine, ISSN 1351-0711, E-ISSN 1470-7926, Vol. 67, no 12, p. 853-860Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background Direct/ measurement of work activities iscostly, so researchers need to distribute resourcesefficiently to elucidate the relationships betweenexposures and back injury.

Methods This study used data from full-shiftelectromyography (EMG; N¼133) to develop threeexposure metrics: mean, 90th percentile and cumulativeEMG. For each metric, the components of variance werecalculated between- and within-subject, and betweengroupfor four different grouping schemes: grouping byindustry (construction, forestry, transportation,warehousing and wood products), by company, by job andby quintiles based on exposures ranked by jobs withinindustries. Attenuation and precision of simulatedexposureeresponse relationships were calculated for eachgrouping scheme to determine efficient sampling strategies.

Results As expected, grouping based on exposurequintiles had the highest between-group variances andlowest attenuation, demonstrating the lowest possibleattenuation with this data.

Conclusion There is potential for grouping schemes toreduce attenuation, but precision losses should beconsidered and whenever possible empirical data shouldbe employed to select potential exposure groupingschemes.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2010. Vol. 67, no 12, p. 853-860
Keywords [en]
exposure assessment
National Category
Occupational Health and Environmental Health
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-8037DOI: 10.1136/oem.2010.055541ISI: 000284148600010PubMedID: 20581418Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-78649647048OAI: oai:DiVA.org:hig-8037DiVA, id: diva2:372708
Available from: 2010-11-26 Created: 2010-11-26 Last updated: 2018-03-13Bibliographically approved

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Trask, Catherine

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