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ITKids Part I: Children's occupations and use of information and communication technologies
Curtin Health Innovation Research Institute, Curtin University, Perth, Australia.
Curtin Health Innovation Research Institute, Curtin University, Perth, Australia.
University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.ORCID iD: 0000-0003-1443-6211
Curtin Health Innovation Research Institute, Curtin University, Perth, Australia.
2011 (English)In: Work: A journal of Prevention, Assesment and rehabilitation, ISSN 1051-9815, E-ISSN 1875-9270, Vol. 38, no 4, 401-412 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Reports in the popular media are that school children use modern information and communication technology (ICT) on a regular basis for a variety of purposes, however little has been documented in the scientific literature about how school children spend their time and the different types of ICT they use.

Method: This paper describes the observed occupations and ICT use of nine Australian primary school children in their natural environments at school and away-from-school during one school day, and compares self-reported exposures with direct observations. Self-reported discomfort scores were obtained throughout the day.

Results: The study identified that paper-based ICT (Old ICT) was used mostly for productive occupations at school, while electronics-based (New ICT) was used mostly during leisure in away-from-school locations. Tasks involving no ICT (Non ICT) accounted for the largest proportion of time in both locations during self-care, leisure and instrumental occupations. End-of-day self-reported time performing different occupations was consistent with data from independent observations. Self reported time using Old ICT and New ICT was marginally over-estimated, and time spent using Non-ICT was marginally under-estimated.

Conclusion: The children in this study used a variety of ICT in the performance of daily occupations in their natural environments. New ICT use was primarily for leisure, but time spent was less than reported among other child studies. Discomfort reports among the participants were low. Children’s self-reports of daily occupations and ICT use has utility as an exposure assessment metric.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2011. Vol. 38, no 4, 401-412 p.
Keyword [en]
Children, ICT, tasks, direct observation, self-report
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-8558DOI: 10.3233/WOR-2011-1167ISI: 000291264400011PubMedID: 21508529Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-79956120243OAI: oai:DiVA.org:hig-8558DiVA: diva2:403322
Available from: 2011-03-11 Created: 2011-03-11 Last updated: 2014-11-11Bibliographically approved

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