hig.sePublications
Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard-cite-them-right
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • sv-SE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • de-DE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Developing digital literacy and digital competence in teacher education: Challenges, dilemmas and opportunities identified through self-study methodology
University of Gävle, Faculty of Education and Business Studies, Department of Culture Studies, Religious Studies and Educational Sciences, Curriculum studies. (Forskargruppen Induction)ORCID iD: 0000-0002-5592-2964
University of Gävle, Faculty of Education and Business Studies, Department of Culture Studies, Religious Studies and Educational Sciences, Curriculum studies. (IT i lärarutbildningen)
2011 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Teachers have an important role in helping pupils achieve the skills needed to become digitally literate and digitally competent in today’s society. Consequently teacher education must help becoming teachers develop these skills and how to teach them. However, previous research indicates a lack of confidence among many teacher educators to do so (Enochsson & Rizza, 2009).

To acquire a deeper understanding of the challenges and opportunities teacher educators and student teachers might encounter when working with, and learning about, ICT as a tool for learning, the authors of this paper carried out a self-study research project (cf. Loughran, 2007; Zeichner, 2007) which focused on our own experiences when planning and teaching a 7,5 ECTS course in initial teacher training. The focus of the course was the pedagogical use of web 2.0-resourses to create learning objects for use in (pre-)schools.  The course could be characterized as innovative since its focus, content and form of distribution, teaching and examination goes far beyond what’s common in initial teacher training inSweden(Enochsson, 2010; Ericsson & Löndahl, 2008). Lectures, seminars and student co-operation were mainly web-based and students were encouraged to take a very high degree of responsibility for their own learning. Web-based resources specifically created for the course were offered to compensate for the scarceness of face-to-face meetings.

The fact that we both have rather different experiences of the content and the technology used in this course, and of being a teacher educator and researcher, was used as a methodological postulate for the self study project. After every seminar, lecture or examination the two of us reflected together. Sometimes non-scheduled student contacts also actuated further reflections. These reflections were recorded digitally and notes were taken. In total five hours of recordings were made at eight times. In between these collaborative reflections, personal reflections were noted and sometimes taped.

Some of the key-findings discussed in the paper are: Insights in challenges and opportunities for both teachers and students to integrate (a) content knowledge; (b) pedagogical knowledge; and (c) technological knowledge; into (d) a Technological Pedagogical Content Knowledge, TPACK (see Mishra & Koehler 2006, 2008, cf. Ferdig, 2006).

How our different skills and experiences gave us a better understanding of what might be difficult or unclear to students, thus making us able to give a better course and more valid student feedback. We also identified some of the mechanism that made us, as “expert” and/or “novice”, take certain things for granted (cf. Sandretto) which in turn might make us miss students’ proximal zone of development. When co-operating closely and complementing each other skills- and experience wise, this is less likely to happen. 

Another insight was how our different proficiencies (i.e. our different understanding of technology, pedagogy and content) affected our assessment of the students’ multimodal presentations, what becomes focused, valued and assessed.

Implications for teacher education, teacher educators’ professional development, student teachers, and for (pre)school are also discussed.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2011.
Keywords [en]
ICT, self-study, Open Educational Resources (OER), professional development, teacher education, web2.0.
National Category
Pedagogy
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-9984OAI: oai:DiVA.org:hig-9984DiVA, id: diva2:438109
Conference
36th Annual Conference of the Association for Teacher Education in Europe (ATEE) Riga, 24–28 August, 2011
Projects
IT i lärarutbildningenAvailable from: 2011-09-01 Created: 2011-09-01 Last updated: 2018-06-11Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

No full text in DiVA

Authority records BETA

Fransson, GöranHolmberg, Jörgen

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Fransson, GöranHolmberg, Jörgen
By organisation
Curriculum studies
Pedagogy

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

urn-nbn

Altmetric score

urn-nbn
Total: 553 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard-cite-them-right
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • sv-SE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • de-DE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf