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Wind Conditions and Ventilation in high rise long Street Models
University of Hong Kong.
University of Hong Kong.
University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Building, Energy and Environmental Engineering, Building science - installation technology. (Inomhusmiljö)
University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Building, Energy and Environmental Engineering, BMG Laboratory. University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Building, Energy and Environmental Engineering, BMG Laboratory.
2010 (English)In: Building and Environment, ISSN 0360-1323, E-ISSN 1873-684X, Vol. 45, no 6, p. 1353-1365Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

We regarded high-rise cities as obstacles and channels to wind. We first studied wind conditions and ventilations in idealized high-rise long street models experimentally and numerically with a constant street width (W = 30 mm), variable street heights (H = 2 W, 2.5W, 3W, 4W), variable street lengths (L = 47.4W, 79W. 333W, 667W) and a parallel approaching wind. The flow rates penetrating into windward entries are a little larger than the reference flow rate in the far upstream free flow through the same area with windward entries in all models. The stream-wise velocity decreases along the street as some air leaves upwardly across street roofs. Near the leeward entry, there is a downward flow which brings some air into the street and results in an accelerating process. In the neighborhood scale long streets (L = 47.4W and 79W), wind in taller streets is stronger and the ventilation is better than a lower one. For the city scale long streets (L = 333W and 667W), a constant flow region exists where the vertical velocity is zero and the stream-wise velocity remains constant. In such regions, turbulent fluctuations across the street roof are more important to air exchange than vertical mean flows. In a taller street, the process to establish the constant flow conditions is longer and the normalized balanced horizontal flow rate is smaller than those in a lower street. In the city scale long streets, the turbulence exchange rate can be 5-10 times greater than the mean flow rate. Crown Copyright (C) 2009 Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2010. Vol. 45, no 6, p. 1353-1365
Keywords [en]
Urban ventilation
National Category
Energy Engineering Civil Engineering
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-10116DOI: 10.1016/j.buildenv.2009.11.019ISI: 000275515400001Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-75949084439OAI: oai:DiVA.org:hig-10116DiVA, id: diva2:441128
Available from: 2011-09-14 Created: 2011-09-14 Last updated: 2018-03-13Bibliographically approved

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Sandberg, MatsClaesson, Leif

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