hig.sePublications
Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard-cite-them-right
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • sv-SE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • de-DE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Variation of Force Amplitude and its Effects on Local Fatigue
Department of Kinesiology, University of Waterloo.
University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.ORCID iD: 0000-0003-1443-6211
Department of Kinesiology, University of Waterloo.
2012 (English)In: European Journal of Applied Physiology, ISSN 1439-6319, E-ISSN 1439-6327, Vol. 112, no 11, 3865-3879 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Trends in industry are leaning towards stereotyped jobs with low workloads. Physical variation is an intervention to reduce fatigue and potentially musculoskeletal disorders in such jobs. Controlled laboratory studies have provided insight into the effectiveness of physical variation but very few have been devoted to intermittent activity without muscular rest as a component. This study was undertaken to determine whether the inclusion of muscular rest would result in physiological responses beyond those composed of varying non-zero forces. Five isometric contraction patterns with the same mean amplitude (15% maximum voluntary contraction, MVC), cycle time (6 seconds), and duty cycle (50%) were compared using multiple biophysical approaches. In exercise, sustained (15%Sust) and intermittent contractions including zero force (0%-30%Int) differed significantly in 19 of 27 response variables. Contractions varying by half the mean force (7.5%-22.5%Int) led to 8 and 7 measured responses that were significantly different from 0%-30%Int and 15%Sus, respectively. A sinusoidal condition (0%-30%Sine) resulted in 2 variables that were significantly different from 0%-30%Int and 16 different from 15%Sus. Finally, 10 response variables suggested that varying forces with 1% as the lower contraction level was significantly less fatiguing than 15%Sus while no responses were significantly different from 0%-30%Int. Sustained contractions led to decreased twitch force 24 hours post-exercise whereas intermittent contractions recovered within 60 minutes. This suggests that time varying force may be a useful intervention to reduce local fatigue in workers performing low-load tasks and that rest per se did not seem to cause any extraordinary effects.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2012. Vol. 112, no 11, 3865-3879 p.
Keyword [en]
Physical Variation, Intermittent Exercise, Work Breaks, Recovery, Ergonomics
National Category
Physiology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-10862DOI: 10.1007/s00421-012-2375-zISI: 000310086800017Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-84869210622OAI: oai:DiVA.org:hig-10862DiVA: diva2:456026
Available from: 2011-11-11 Created: 2011-11-11 Last updated: 2014-11-11Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

No full text

Other links

Publisher's full textScopus

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Mathiassen, Svend Erik
By organisation
Department of Occupational and Public Health SciencesCentre for Musculoskeletal Research
In the same journal
European Journal of Applied Physiology
Physiology

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

Altmetric score

Total: 1081 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard-cite-them-right
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • sv-SE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • de-DE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf