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Concurrent cognitive task may improve motor work performance and reduce muscle fatigue
Saint Petersburg State University, Russia.
Saint Petersburg State University, Russia.
University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, CBF. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.ORCID iD: 0000-0003-1443-6211
University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, CBF. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
2012 (English)In: Work: A journal of Prevention, Assesment and rehabilitation, ISSN 1051-9815, E-ISSN 1875-9270, Vol. 41, no Suppl. 1, p. 2893-2896Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Performance of certain cognitive tasks either during physical load or in rest pauses between boosts might lead to slowing of muscle fatigue and fatigue related decline in performance. Seventeen right-handed healthy volunteers (age 24±1.4, 8 males) participated in this study, aiming to investigate the effect of the level of the cognitive information processing – 1) passive perception of audio stimuli, 2) active stimuli discrimination, 3) active stimuli discrimination following motor response - on motor task performance (handgrip test 30% and 7% of MVC) and muscle fatigue development. Cognitive tasks show the following effects on motor work: i) Perceived fatigue during 30 % MVC (fatiguing) condition developed slower if participant pressed button in response to deviant acoustic stimuli, as compared to passive listening. Counting task, an active task without motor component, took the intermediate position and did not differ significantly from two other cognitive tasks. ii) MVC after 30% MVC (fatiguing) condition tended to decrease stronger when accompanied with passive listening in comparison with both active tasks. iii) Motor task performance during 30% MVC (fatiguing) condition was better for active cognitive task with motor component than for passive task. Active task without motor component took the intermediate position and did not differ significantly from both the other cognitive tasks.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2012. Vol. 41, no Suppl. 1, p. 2893-2896
Keywords [en]
Handgrip test, dual task paradigm, cognitive information processing, central fatigue
National Category
Neurosciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-11548DOI: 10.3233/wor-2012-0540-2893ISI: 000306361803006Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-84859810036OAI: oai:DiVA.org:hig-11548DiVA, id: diva2:505406
Available from: 2012-02-23 Created: 2012-02-23 Last updated: 2018-03-13Bibliographically approved

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Publisher's full textScopushttp://dx.doi.org/10.3233/WOR-2012-0540-2893

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Mathiassen, Svend ErikLyskov, Eugene

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