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Cost-efficient observation of working postures from video recordings – more videos, more observers or more views per observer?
University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, CBF. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.ORCID iD: 0000-0003-1443-6211
University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, CBF. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, CBF. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
2012 (English)In: Work: A journal of Prevention, Assesment and rehabilitation, ISSN 1051-9815, E-ISSN 1875-9270, Vol. 41, no Suppl. 1, p. 2302-2306Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In ergonomics, assessing the working postures of an individual by observation is a very common practice. The present study investigated whether monetary resources devoted to an observational study should preferably be invested in collecting many video recordings of the work, or in having several observers estimate postures from available videos multiple times. On the basis of a data set of observed working postures among hairdressers, necessary information in terms of posture variability, observer variability, and costs for recording and observing videos was entered into equations providing the total cost of data collection and the precision (informative value) of the resulting estimates of two variables: percentages time with the arm elevated 90 degrees. In all 160 data collection strategies, differing with respect to the number of video recordings and the number of repeated observations of each recording, were simulated and compared for cost and precision. For both posture variables, the most cost-efficient strategy for a given budget was to engage 4 observers to look at available video recordings, rather than to have one observer look at more recordings. Since the latter strategy is the more common in ergonomics practice, we recommend reconsidering standard practice in observational posture assessment.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2012. Vol. 41, no Suppl. 1, p. 2302-2306
Keywords [en]
resource consumption, mean exposure, risk assessment, posture observation, efficiency
National Category
Occupational Health and Environmental Health
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-11553DOI: 10.3233/wor-2012-0456-2302ISI: 000306361802071Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-84859858198OAI: oai:DiVA.org:hig-11553DiVA, id: diva2:505423
Available from: 2012-02-23 Created: 2012-02-23 Last updated: 2018-03-13Bibliographically approved

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Mathiassen, Svend ErikLiv, PerWahlström, Jens

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