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Assessing whole body vibration exposure for use in epidemiological studies of back injuries: measurements, observations and self-reports
School of Environmental Health, College for Interdisciplinary Studies, University of British Columbia.
University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, CBF. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
School of Environmental Health, College for Interdisciplinary Studies, University of British Columbia.
School of Biomedical Physiology and Kinesiology, Simon Fraser University.
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2012 (English)In: Ergonomics, ISSN 0014-0139, E-ISSN 1366-5847, Vol. 55, no 4, p. 415-424Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Improved assessment of whole body vibration exposure is needed for epidemiological studies investigating the causes of low back disorders. Vibration was measured on 54 worker-days in five heavy industries, with data collected on observed and self-reported driving conditions, demographics, and vehicle characteristics. Variables significant at p<0.1 in simple linear regressions (20 of 34) were retained for mixed effects multiple regressions to determine the best prediction of rms vibration level and 8-h equivalent vibration exposure. Vibration was measured, on average, for 205 min per work shift (SD 105). Means and standard deviations in ms-2 were: x-axis 0.35 (0.19); y-axis 0.34 (0.28); z-axis 0.54 (0.23); vector sum 0.90 (0.49); and 8-h equivalent vector sum 0.70 (0.37). The final three regression models retained only 2 or 3 of the 34 variables (driving speed (<20 km/h and/or 20–40 km/h) and industry and/or vehicle type and explained up to 60% of the variance (R2=0.26–0.6))

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2012. Vol. 55, no 4, p. 415-424
Keyword [en]
whole-body vibration; exposure assessment; determinants modelling; heavy equipment; epidemiology
National Category
Occupational Health and Environmental Health
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-11613DOI: 10.1080/00140139.2011.643243ISI: 000303584000003Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-84859175033OAI: oai:DiVA.org:hig-11613DiVA, id: diva2:509566
Available from: 2012-03-13 Created: 2012-03-13 Last updated: 2018-03-13Bibliographically approved

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Trask, Catherine

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