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The evolution of reversed sexual dimorphism in birds: a comparative study in charadriiformes
University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Electronics, Mathematics and Natural Sciences. (Biologi)
Laboratorie dÉcologie, Systématique et Evolution, CNRS UMR 8079, Université Paris-Sud, Batiment 362, F-91405 Orsay Cedex, France. (Ecology group)
2012 (English)Conference paper, Poster (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Reversed size dimorphism is common in birds of prey, owls and in waders. Not much attention has been paid to the evolution of morphological characters such as wing morphology and variables related to flight agility. The aim of this study was to investigate if the morphological variables in shorebirds, related to flight performance, such as wing length, wing area, wing loading, and factors such as aspect ratio, are related to the display-flights performed by these different species of shorebirds. Data on morphological variables, e.g. body mass, wing length, wing area etc. was collected at the British Museum of Natural History, London, UK.

Data on behavioral variables, e.g. duration of a display flight or height of display flight was extracted from the published literature. There was a significant difference in wing length dimorphism (t = 2.51, p= 0.0402), when comparing between species within the same genus that had higher versus lower level of flight performance. There was also a significant difference in wing area dimorphism (t = 2.84, p= 0.025), for higher versus lower level of flight performance. However, there was no such difference for weight dimorphism, nor for tarsus dimorphism, or for wing loading or aspect ratio, when comparing between species for higher versus lower level of flight performance. Further analyses will be presented and a suggestive explanation for the evolution of reversed sexual dimorphism will be discussed at the congress. The hypotheses for increased food- or incubation efficiency is with several arguments irrelevant to shorebirds (which will be discussed).

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2012.
Keyword [en]
Evolution, reversed sexual dimorphism, birds, display-flights, comparative study
National Category
Evolutionary Biology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-13092OAI: oai:DiVA.org:hig-13092DiVA: diva2:556286
Conference
14th Congress of the International Society for Behavioral Ecology, 12–18 August, Lund University, Lund, Sweden
Available from: 2012-09-24 Created: 2012-09-24 Last updated: 2012-09-25Bibliographically approved

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CiteExportLink to record
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Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard-cite-them-right
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • sv-SE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
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  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • de-DE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
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