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Experimental masseter muscle pain alters jaw-neck motor strategy
Dept. of Odontology, Clinical Oral Physiology, Umeå University.
Dept. of Odontology, Clinical Oral Physiology, Umeå University.
University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-4556-2846
Dept. of Odontology, Clinical Oral Physiology, Umeå University.
2013 (English)In: European Journal of Pain, ISSN 1090-3801, E-ISSN 1532-2149, Vol. 17, no 7, 995-1004 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND:

A functional integration between the jaw and neck regions has been demonstrated during normal jaw function. The effect of masseter muscle pain on this integrated motor behaviour in man is unknown. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of induced masseter muscle pain on jaw-neck movements during a continuous jaw opening-closing task.

METHODS:

Sixteen healthy men performed continuous jaw opening-closing movements to a target position, defined as 75% of the maximum jaw opening. Each subject performed two trials without pain (controls) and two trials with masseter muscle pain, induced with hypertonic saline as a single injection. Simultaneous movements of the mandible and the head were registered with a wireless optoelectronic three-dimensional recording system. Differences in movement amplitudes between trials were analysed with Friedman's test and corrected Wilcoxon matched pairs test.

RESULTS:

The head movement amplitudes were significantly larger during masseter muscle pain trials compared with control. Jaw movement amplitudes did not differ significantly between any of the trials after corrected Wilcoxon tests. The ratio between head and jaw movement amplitudes was significantly larger during the first pain trial compared with control.

CONCLUSIONS:

Experimental masseter muscle pain in humans affected integrated jaw-neck movements by increasing the neck component during continuous jaw opening-closing tasks. The findings indicate that pain can alter the strategy for jaw-neck motor control, which further underlines the functional integration between the jaw and neck regions. This altered strategy may have consequences for development of musculoskeletal pain in the jaw and neck regions.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2013. Vol. 17, no 7, 995-1004 p.
National Category
Other Medical Sciences not elsewhere specified
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-13215DOI: 10.1002/j.1532-2149.2012.00263.xISI: 000321204100007Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-84883787899OAI: oai:DiVA.org:hig-13215DiVA: diva2:561068
Available from: 2012-10-17 Created: 2012-10-17 Last updated: 2017-12-07Bibliographically approved

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