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Sit-stand desks and sedentary behavior in Swedish call centre workers
Curtin University, Perth.
University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, Occupational health science. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, Occupational health science. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-5055-0698
University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, Occupational health science. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.ORCID iD: 0000-0003-1443-6211
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2012 (English)In: Be active 2012, 2012, S94- p.Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Introduction: Adults spend approximately 8 to 9 hours of the day in sedentary behavior and much of this is gathered at work. The rising level of occupational sedentary behavior is both a public health and occupational health concern due to the emerging evidence regarding the deleterious effect that sedentary behavior has on health, independent of physical activity. In the occupational setting, sit-stand desks have been purported to offer a means of reducing sedentariness. This study aimed to investigate whether or not use of sit-stand desks and awareness of the importance of postural variation and breaks are associated with the pattern of sedentary behavior in call centre workers.

Method: The data came from a cross-sectional observation study of fifteen Swedish call centres, carried out in 2002–2003. Ten operators were randomly selected from each of the call centres and invited to participate. Inclinometers recorded ‘seated’ or ‘standing/walking’ episodes of the operators over a full work shift. Differences in sedentary behavior based on desk type (categorized as ‘sit-stand’ or ‘sit’) and awareness of the importance of posture variation and breaking up seated computer work within those using a sit-stand desk were assessed by non-parametric analyses.

Results: Four operators declined to participate and 15 operators had inclinometer recordings that were not of sufficient quality. Of the remaining 131 operators, 90 (68.7%) worked at a sit-stand desk. Working at a sit-stand desk, as opposed to a sit desk, was associated with a modest reduction in the time seated (78.5 vs 83.8%, p = 0.010), and less time taken to accumulate 5 minutes of standing/walking (36.2 vs 46.3 minutes, p = 0.022), but no significant difference to sitting episode length or the number of switches between sitting and standing/walking per hour. Ergonomics awareness had no significant association with any sedentary behavior pattern variable among those using a sit-stand desk.

Conclusion: Use of sit-stand desks was associated with better sedentary behavior in call centre workers, however ergonomics awareness did not enhance the effect. The growing number of people in occupations dominated by sedentary work and the clear evidence of the importance of sedentary behavior as a key lifestyle risk factor support the need to develop effective interventions. Sit-stand desks may be an important remedy in this endeavor, particularly in office settings, while ergonomics awareness may be able to contribute to further changes in sedentary behavior if improved and supported by the work organization.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2012. S94- p.
Series
Journal of science and medicine in sport, ISSN 1440-2440 ; Vol 15. Suppl 1
National Category
Environmental Health and Occupational Health
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-13368DOI: 10.1016/j.jsams.2012.11.476OAI: oai:DiVA.org:hig-13368DiVA: diva2:565838
Conference
4th International Congress on Physical Activity and Public Health, 31st October - 3rd November 2012, Sydney, Australia
Available from: 2012-11-08 Created: 2012-11-08 Last updated: 2017-09-08Bibliographically approved

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Abbott, RebeccaHeiden, MarinaMathiassen, Svend Erik
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CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard-cite-them-right
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • sv-SE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
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  • de-DE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
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