hig.sePublications
Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard-cite-them-right
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • sv-SE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • de-DE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Acoustical conditions in the classroom I: Speech intelligibility and recall of spoken material heard at different signal-to-noise ratios.
University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Building, Energy and Environmental Engineering, Buildning science - applied psychology. (Environmental Psychology)ORCID iD: 0000-0003-4298-7459
University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Building, Energy and Environmental Engineering, Buildning science - applied psychology. (Environmental Psychology)
University of Gävle, Faculty of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Department of Building, Energy and Environmental Engineering, Buildning science - applied psychology. (Environmental Psychology)
2013 (English)In: 42nd International Congress and Exposition on Noise Control Engineering 2013, INTER-NOISE 2013: Noise Control for Quality of Life, 2013, p. 4957-4964Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

This study explored speech intelligibility and free recall of word lists heard under different signal-to-noise (S/N) ratios. Pre-experimental measures of working memory capacity (WMC) were taken to explore individual susceptibility to the disruptive effects of noise. The thirty-five participants first completed a WMC-operation span task in quiet and later listened to spoken word lists containing 11 one-syllable phonetically balanced words presented at four different S/N ratios (+12, +9, +6, and +3). Participants repeated (shadowed) each word aloud immediately after its presentation and performed a free recall task of the words after the end of the list. The speech intelligibility function decreased linearly with increasing S/N levels for both the high-WMC and low-WMC groups. Recall and memory of the words decreased with increasing S/N levels only for the low-WMC group. Recall and memory for the high-WMC individuals was not affected by increased S/N levels. Our results suggest that impoverished acoustical conditions impair speech intelligibility and memory, but also that a high WMC may counteract some of the negative effects of speech noise.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2013. p. 4957-4964
National Category
Applied Psychology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-15065Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-84904489307OAI: oai:DiVA.org:hig-15065DiVA, id: diva2:642717
Conference
InterNoise 2013, Innsbruck, Sept 15-18, 2013 (invited speaker)
Funder
Swedish Research Council Formas, 7555Available from: 2013-08-23 Created: 2013-08-23 Last updated: 2018-03-13Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

No full text in DiVA

Scopus

Authority records BETA

Hygge, StaffanLjung, RobertIsraelsson, Karl

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Hygge, StaffanLjung, RobertIsraelsson, Karl
By organisation
Buildning science - applied psychology
Applied Psychology

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

urn-nbn

Altmetric score

urn-nbn
Total: 1006 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard-cite-them-right
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • sv-SE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • de-DE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf