hig.sePublications
Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard-cite-them-right
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • sv-SE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • de-DE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
A validity study of self-reported daily texting frequency, cell phone characteristics, and texting styles among young adults
University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research. Department of Public Health, Temple University, Philadelphia, United States ; West Virginia University, Injury Control Research Center, Morgantown, United States .
West Virginia University, Injury Control Research Center, Morgantown, United States; Department of Occupational and Environmental Health Sciences, West Virginia University, School of Public Health, Morgantown, United States .
West Virginia University, Injury Control Research Center, Morgantown, United States ; Department of Epidemiology, West Virginia University, School of Public Health, Morgantown, United States .
2015 (English)In: BMC Research Notes, ISSN 1756-0500, E-ISSN 1756-0500, Vol. 8, 120Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background

Texting is associated with adverse health effects including musculoskeletal disorders, sleep disturbances, and traffic crashes. Many studies have relied on self-reported texting frequency, yet the validity of self-reports is unknown. Our objective was to provide some of the first data on the validity of self-reported texting frequency, cell phone characteristics including input device (e.g. touchscreen), key configuration (e.g., QWERTY), and texting styles including phone orientation (e.g., horizontal) and hands holding the phone while texting.

Methods

Data were collected using a self-administered questionnaire and observation of a texting task among college students ages 18 to 24. To gauge agreement between self-reported and phone bill-derived categorical number of daily text messages sent, we calculated percent of agreement, Spearman correlation coefficient, and a linear weighted kappa statistic. For agreement between self-reported and observed cell phone characteristics and texting styles we calculated percentages of agreement. We used chi-square tests to detect significant differences (α = 0.05) by gender and study protocol.

Results

There were 106 participants; 87 of which had complete data for texting frequency analyses. Among these 87, there was 26% (95% CI: 21–31) agreement between self-reported and phone bill-derived number of daily text messages sent with a Spearman’s rho of 0.48 and a weighted kappa of 0.17 (95% CI: 0.06-0.27). Among those who did not accurately report the number of daily texts sent, 81% overestimated this number. Among the full sample (n = 106), there was high agreement between self-reported and observed texting input device (96%, 95% CI: 91–99), key configuration (89%, 95% CI: 81–94), and phone orientation while texting (93%, 95% CI: 86–97). No differences were found by gender or study protocol among any items.

Conclusions

While young adults correctly reported their cell phone’s characteristics and phone orientation while texting, most incorrectly estimated the number of daily text messages they sent. This suggests that while self-reported texting frequency may be useful for studies where relative ordering is adequate, it should not be used in epidemiologic studies to identify a risk threshold. For these studies, it is recommended that a less biased measure, such as a cell phone bill, be utilized.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2015. Vol. 8, 120
Keyword [en]
Young adults, College students, Cell phones, Text messaging, Validity of self-reports, Short message service (SMS)
National Category
Environmental Health and Occupational Health
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-15087DOI: 10.1186/s13104-015-1090-3PubMedID: 25890089Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-84927709388OAI: oai:DiVA.org:hig-15087DiVA: diva2:644106
Available from: 2013-08-29 Created: 2013-08-29 Last updated: 2015-10-14Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

No full text

Other links

Publisher's full textPubMedScopus

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Gold, Judith
By organisation
Department of Occupational and Public Health SciencesCentre for Musculoskeletal Research
In the same journal
BMC Research Notes
Environmental Health and Occupational Health

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

Altmetric score

Total: 281 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard-cite-them-right
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • sv-SE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • de-DE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf