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Mobile input device type, texting style and screen size influence upper extremity and trapezius muscle activity, and cervical posture while texting
School of Health Related Professions, Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey.
Occupational Therapy Assistant Program, Harcum College; Department of Rehabilitation Sciences, Temple University .
Department of Occupational Medicine, Epidemiology, and Prevention, Hofstra North Shore-LIJ School of Medicine.
University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research. Department of Public Health, Temple University.
2015 (English)In: Applied Ergonomics, ISSN 0003-6870, E-ISSN 1872-9126, Vol. 50, 98-104 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The study aim was to determine the effects of input device type, texting style, and screen size on upper extremity muscle activity and neck and wrist posture during a short texting task in college students. Users of a physical keypad produced greater thumb and wrist extensor muscle force than when texting with a touch screen; using a touch screen required greater wrist extension. Texting on either device produced greater finger flexor and wrist extensor muscle force and greater radial deviation when 1 hand/thumb was used, compared to both hands/thumbs. As touch screen size increased, more participants held the device on their lap, and there was a trend for greater muscle force in finger flexors, wrist extensors, and trapezius, and greater wrist extension, ulnar deviation, and cervical spine flexion. Future research can help inform whether the ergonomic stressors observed during texting are associated with the risk of musculoskeletal disorders.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2015. Vol. 50, 98-104 p.
Keyword [en]
Ergonomic exposure, SMS (short message service), Text messaging
National Category
Environmental Health and Occupational Health
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-15088DOI: 10.1016/j.apergo.2015.03.003ISI: 000355775200012PubMedID: 25959323Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-84928923117OAI: oai:DiVA.org:hig-15088DiVA: diva2:644108
Available from: 2013-08-29 Created: 2013-08-29 Last updated: 2015-07-01Bibliographically approved

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CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

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Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard-cite-them-right
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • sv-SE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • de-DE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
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  • text
  • asciidoc
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