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Neck pain brought into focus
University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, Occupational health science. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.
2014 (English)In: Work: A journal of Prevention, Assesment and rehabilitation, ISSN 1051-9815, E-ISSN 1875-9270, Vol. 47, no 3, p. 413-418Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

A time honored dictum states that the eyes "lead the body", i.e. that the body typically adjust its position to compensate for an impoverished retinal image (e. g., as due to optical blur, and/or inappropriately sized visual target). But only moderate or low level of evidence exists in support of this view. Inconclusive evidence does not, however, equal negative evidence. The accommodation/vergence system does exhibit signs of overload in contemporary working life, including eye discomfort, transient myopia, altered pattern of eye-lens oscillations, and associated phoria. Accommodation/vergence overload, caused by non-ergonomic near work, may also emerge as quickly as within one regular workday. Long-term musculoskeletal consequences of high accommodation/vergence demands have nevertheless not yet been studied in any detail. A research agenda which aims to provide multi-scientific evidence for eye-neck/shoulder interactions with public health implications and which also, in addition, study the eye-neck/shoulder mechanisms and elucidates the operating characteristics, should consequently be highly warranted. This new knowledge would be useful for physiotherapists, ergonomists and opticians, who in their profession treat patients experiencing vision-and musculoskeletal disorders. If both visual and the musculoskeletal aspects are given full and equal weight in the design and evaluation of work places, it is predicted to lead to an improved quality of life for the individual worker, and an enhanced productivity for the employer.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2014. Vol. 47, no 3, p. 413-418
Keywords [en]
Accommodation; asthenopia; gaze stabilization; electromyography; computer work; visual ergonomics
National Category
Occupational Health and Environmental Health
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-15250DOI: 10.3233/WOR-131776ISI: 000333080700014PubMedID: 24284669Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-84900435075OAI: oai:DiVA.org:hig-15250DiVA, id: diva2:648316
Note

Invited Sounding board article

Available from: 2013-09-15 Created: 2013-09-15 Last updated: 2018-03-13Bibliographically approved

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Richter, Hans

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