hig.sePublications
Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard-cite-them-right
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • sv-SE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • de-DE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Cardiac arrest and hypothermia treatment-function and life satisfaction among survivors in the first 6 months
Institutionen för kirurgiska vetenskaper, Uppsala universitet.
Institutionen för kirurgiska vetenskaper, Uppsala universitet.
Institutionen för kirurgiska vetenskaper, Uppsala universitet.
University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Health and Caring Sciences.
2014 (English)In: Resuscitation, ISSN 0300-9572, E-ISSN 1873-1570, Vol. 85, no 4, 538-543 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Aim of the study:

To describe differences over time in outcome, physical and cognitive function among survivors of cardiac arrest treated with hypothermia and to examine survivors’ life satisfaction 6 months after cardiac arrest as well as gender differences. Methods: The study was prospective and included 45 cardiac arrest survivors admitted to three Swedish hospitals between 2008 and 2012. Participants were followed from intensive care unit discharge to one and six months after cardiac arrest. In addition to cerebral performance category (CPC), participants were asked to complete questionnaires regarding activities in daily life (Barthel index), cognitive function (mini mental state examination), and life satisfaction (LiSat-11). Results: Outcome measured using CPC scores improved over time. At 6 months, all participants were classified as having a good outcome. At one month, participants were impaired but improved over time in their activities in daily life and cognitive function. At 6 months satisfaction with "life as a whole" was seen in 70%. Conclusions: Cardiac arrest survivors are satisfied with life as a whole despite a severe illness that has impaired their physical and cognitive function, which seemed to improve over time. Predicting patients’ functional outcome in early stages is difficult, and the CPC score alone is not sufficient to assess patients’ function. It is a need to reach a consensus to which instruments best reflect physical and cognitive function as well as to specify a rehabilitation plan.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2014. Vol. 85, no 4, 538-543 p.
Keyword [en]
Cardiac arrest, Hypothermia treatment, Intensive care, Neurological outcome, Cognitive function, Life satisfaction
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-15906DOI: 10.1016/j.resuscitation.2013.12.020ISI: 000332778000030Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-84895927127OAI: oai:DiVA.org:hig-15906DiVA: diva2:681380
Projects
Kylhjärtstopp
Available from: 2013-12-19 Created: 2013-12-19 Last updated: 2017-12-06Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

No full text

Other links

Publisher's full textScopus

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Kristofferzon, Marja-Leena
By organisation
Department of Health and Caring Sciences
In the same journal
Resuscitation
Nursing

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

doi
urn-nbn

Altmetric score

doi
urn-nbn
Total: 798 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard-cite-them-right
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • sv-SE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • de-DE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf