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Good practice in mental health care for socially marginalised groups in Europe: a qualitative study of expert views in 14 countries
Unit for Social and Community Psychiatry, Queen Mary University of London, London, UK .
Unit for Social and Community Psychiatry, Queen Mary University of London, London, UK .
Unit for Social and Community Psychiatry, Queen Mary University of London, London, UK .
Ludwig Boltzmann Institute for Social Psychiatry, Vienna, Austria.
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2012 (English)In: BMC Public Health, ISSN 1471-2458, Vol. 12, -Article Number: 248 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Socially marginalised groups tend to have higher rates of mental disorders than the general population and can be difficult to engage in health care. Providing mental health care for these groups represents a particular challenge, and evidence on good practice is required. This study explored the experiences and views of experts in 14 European countries regarding mental health care for six socially marginalised groups: long-term unemployed; street sex workers; homeless; refugees/asylum seekers; irregular migrants and members of the travelling communities.      

Methods: Two highly deprived areas were selected in the capital cities of 14 countries, and experts were interviewed for each of the six marginalised groups. Semi-structured interviews with case vignettes were conducted to explore experiences of good practice and analysed using thematic analysis.      

Results: In a total of 154 interviews, four components of good practice were identified across all six groups: a) establishing outreach programmes to identify and engage with individuals with mental disorders; b) facilitating access to services that provide different aspects of health care, including mental health care, and thus reducing the need for further referrals; c) strengthening the collaboration and co-ordination between different services; and d) disseminating information on services both to marginalised groups and to practitioners in the area.      

Conclusions: Experts across Europe hold similar views on what constitutes good practice in mental health care for marginalised groups. Care may be improved through better service organisation, coordination and information.      

  

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2012. Vol. 12, -Article Number: 248 p.
Keyword [en]
Marginalisation, Mental health care, Health care systems, Good practice, Autonomy
National Category
Health Care Service and Management, Health Policy and Services and Health Economy
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-16090DOI: 10.1186/1471-2458-12-248OAI: oai:DiVA.org:hig-16090DiVA: diva2:689176
Available from: 2014-01-20 Created: 2014-01-20 Last updated: 2014-02-03Bibliographically approved

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CiteExportLink to record
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Citation style
  • apa
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