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The ability of non-computer tasks to increase biomechanical exposure variability in computer-intensive office work
Universidade Federal de São Carlos.
University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, Occupational health science. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.ORCID iD: 0000-0001-9327-6177
University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences, Occupational health science. University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research.ORCID iD: 0000-0003-1443-6211
Universidade Federal de São Carlos.
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2015 (English)In: Ergonomics, ISSN 0014-0139, E-ISSN 1366-5847, Vol. 58, no 1, p. 50-64Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Postures and muscle activity in the upper body were recorded from 50 academics office workers during 2 hours of normal work, categorised by observation into computer work (CW) and three non-computer (NC) tasks (NC seated work, NC standing/walking work and breaks). NC tasks differed significantly in exposures from CW, with standing/walking NC tasks representing the largest contrasts for most of the exposure variables. For the majority of workers, exposure variability was larger in their present job than in CW alone, as measured by the job variability ratio (JVR), i.e. the ratio between min–min variabilities in the job and in CW. Calculations of JVRs for simulated jobs containing different proportions of CW showed that variability could, indeed, be increased by redistributing available tasks, but that substantial increases could only be achieved by introducing more vigorous tasks in the job, in casu illustrated by cleaning.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis Group, 2015. Vol. 58, no 1, p. 50-64
Keywords [en]
task contrasts, exposure variation, posture, EMG
National Category
Occupational Health and Environmental Health
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-16568DOI: 10.1080/00140139.2014.965753ISI: 000347788100006PubMedID: 25345757Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-84921433571OAI: oai:DiVA.org:hig-16568DiVA, id: diva2:714025
Funder
Forte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare, 2009-1761Available from: 2014-04-24 Created: 2014-04-24 Last updated: 2018-03-13Bibliographically approved

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Srinivasan, DivyaMathiassen, Svend Erik

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