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Effects of Tracking Technology on Daily Life of Persons With Dementia: Three Experimental Single-Case Studies
University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Health and Caring Sciences, Caring science. School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-6381-1922
University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Health and Caring Sciences, Caring science. Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-9912-5350
Department of Neuroscience, Physiotherapy, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden .
School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden ; Faculty of Health Sciences, Buskerud University College, Drammen, Norway.
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2015 (English)In: American Journal of Alzheimer’s Disease and Other Dementia, ISSN 1533-3175, E-ISSN 1938-2731, Vol. 30, no 1, p. 29-40Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objectives: To investigate the effects of using tracking technology on independent outdoor activities and psychological well-being in 3 persons with dementia (PwDs) and their spouses.

Methods: Three experimental single-case studies with an A1B1A2B2 design. The intervention entailed access to a passive positioning alarm and technical support. Continual daily measures of independent outdoor activities among PwDs’ and spouses’ worries about these activities were made during all phases.

Results: Access to a tracking technology consistently increased the independent outdoor activities of 2 PwDs. One of the spouses consistently reported decreased worry during B phases, another’s worry decreased only in B2, and the third showed little variability in worrying across all phases.

Conclusion: Tracking technology may support PwDs to engage in independent outdoor activities and decrease spouses’ worries; however, randomized controlled group studies are needed to investigate whether these results can be replicated on a group level.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2015. Vol. 30, no 1, p. 29-40
Keywords [en]
Alzheimer's; dementia, experimental single-case study, information and communication technology, outdoors, tracking technology
National Category
Gerontology, specialising in Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-16898DOI: 10.1177/1533317514531441ISI: 000349294400004PubMedID: 24771764Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-84922645603OAI: oai:DiVA.org:hig-16898DiVA, id: diva2:724689
Projects
Electronic tracking system in dementia care (PmD ICT)
Funder
Multidisciplinary research focused on Parkinson’s disease - MultiParkAvailable from: 2014-06-13 Created: 2014-06-13 Last updated: 2018-03-13Bibliographically approved

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Olsson, AnnakarinEngström, Maria

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