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Everything is possible!: - what can happen when the content in art education is equal to a visual culture that young people live in and take part of in their everyday life
University of Gävle, Faculty of Education and Business Studies, Department of Educational sciences. (ECE, VKG)ORCID iD: 0000-0002-0772-5157
2014 (English)In: 34th World Congress of the International Society for Education through Art (InSEA ) :  Diversity through Art, Change, Continuity, Context: Abstracts : Pecha Kucha Presentations, 2014, 1- p.Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

The aim of this paper is to discuss the content of Art in lower secondary school education. What happens when the content is equal to a visual culture that young people live in and take part of in their everyday life? To be able to make a transition from traditional art education such as learning traditional art technics, to explore and work with contemporary visual culture that concerns young people to day, it is crucial to find out what kind of visual culture is relevant to teenagers to day. When I started working at the University of Gävle in Sweden I had the opportunity to look back at my own practise as an art teacher. In a project with pupils between the ages of 13 to 16 were asked to show in photographs and clarifying text, what they thought possibleto do technically in the art class classroom. The 13-year olds took photographs of objects that represented what they saw as possible to do in that classroom. After the pupils had taken, shown and commented on their photographs a discussion with the pupils about the content, possibilities and limitations that they experienced in that art class room followed. As a second part of the project pupils aged 16 were then invited to discuss the same questions. The forms of visual culture that turned out to be the most important to both groups were digital forms of pictures, such as film, photographs made with their mobile phones, and often published on social forums such as Facebook or Instagram, as well as computer games with there visually designed settings. In conclusion the photographs and the discussions following showed that when the pupils could work with a visual media that they meet in their everyday life it gave meaning to the art subject. Some even expressed that in the art class room “everything was possible”.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2014. 1- p.
Keyword [en]
art, lower secondary school, contemporary, visual culture, teaching
National Category
Educational Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-17348OAI: oai:DiVA.org:hig-17348DiVA: diva2:737772
Conference
34th World Congress of the International Society for Education through Art (InSEA 2014), Diversity through Art, Change, Continuity, Context, 7-11 July 2014, Melbourne, Australia.
Available from: 2014-08-14 Created: 2014-08-14 Last updated: 2016-01-22Bibliographically approved

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CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard-cite-them-right
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • sv-SE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • de-DE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf