hig.sePublications
Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard-cite-them-right
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • sv-SE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • de-DE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Different ways of defining and measuring company size when studying its effects on OHS: A literature study
University of Gävle, Centre for Musculoskeletal Research. University of Gävle, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, Department of Occupational and Public Health Sciences.
2014 (English)In: 11th International Symposium on Human Factors in Organisational Design and Management, Nordic Ergonomics Society , 2014, 587-593 p.Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Objective and method: Company size is a proxy for other variables affecting occupational health and safety (OHS) performance. The aim of this literature study was twofold: to give an overview on how it empirically has been shown that smaller and larger companies differ from one another in terms of OHS, and to present how earlier studies have defined company size when studying its mediating effects on OHS. A search strategy with search terms was used in the major databases, as well as inspecting the reference list of appropriate studies recovered. A total of 29 articles were included.

Findings: Examining what empirically has been shown on company size differences in terms of OHS resulted in ten different themes. For example that the OHS standard improves as company size increases, that there is an inverse relationship between company size and injury frequency, and that the rate of absenteeism is lower in small companies. The examined studies were similar, in that they found differences attributed to company size. They differed, however, in the ways they defined company size as a variable in analysis. To define company size as number of employees was the most commonly used approach (27 out of 29 studies). One study used number of man-labor years as definition. One study used the contractors’ annual volume of business in dollars as definition. The scale of measure that was most commonly used as variable for measuring company size was ordinal scale data (23 out of 29 studies). Three studies used ratio scale data. Three studies did not specify scale of measurement.

Conclusion: It is important to carefully consider what definition and scale of measure to use for the sake of studying the mediating effects of company size on OHS. Some of the less commonly used alternatives could be relevant.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Nordic Ergonomics Society , 2014. 587-593 p.
Keyword [en]
Company size, Proxy variable, Occupational health and safety (OHS), Ergonomics
National Category
Work Sciences Production Engineering, Human Work Science and Ergonomics
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:hig:diva-17438DOI: 10.4122/dtu:2399OAI: oai:DiVA.org:hig-17438DiVA: diva2:741804
Conference
11 th International Symposium on Human Factors in Organisational Design and Management (ODAM) 46th Annual Nordic Ergonomics Society (NES) Conference, Ergonomic challenges in the new economy, 17-20 August 2014, Copenhagen, Denmark
Note

Part of Track: G - Application areas     Session: G4 - Service industries & small and medium sized enterprises

Available from: 2014-08-29 Created: 2014-08-29 Last updated: 2016-01-14Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

No full text

Other links

Publisher's full textConference ProceedingsAbstract (for download)

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Nordlöf, Hasse
By organisation
Centre for Musculoskeletal ResearchDepartment of Occupational and Public Health Sciences
Work SciencesProduction Engineering, Human Work Science and Ergonomics

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

doi
urn-nbn

Altmetric score

doi
urn-nbn
Total: 694 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard-cite-them-right
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • sv-SE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • de-DE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf